YNP Report - July 4, 2024

YNP Report - July 4, 2024

As we turn the calendar to July and Independence Day we enter the prime fishing season in Yellowstone park. No other month offers more options to the dry fly angler in Yellowstone Park than July. In the coming weeks we will see every major Hatch of the year on all of our favorite waters across the park. Pale morning duns, caddis, green drakes, salmon flies, and golden stones just to name a few.

Opening day on the caldera stretch of the Yellowstone River was this past Monday, July 1. As is normally the case for the opener, water levels were high, but very fishable. Hatches of pale morning duns, and caddis had fish looking looking up throughout the river from Chittenden Bridge all the way up to Le hardy Rapids, and the fishing boundary below Fishing Bridge. Water levels will continue to fall opening up more and more access over the coming weeks, and some of the best hatches of the season are eminent. Be on the lookout for salmon flies, green drakes, and gray drakes over the coming days and weeks. This fishery will produce some of the finest site fishing for rising trout, anywhere in the world over the next month.

Another July favorite, the Gallatin River in Yellowstone Park should be on your list for the upcoming week. Water conditions are ideal here, and as warm weather brings higher water temps over the next few days we will see some superb hatches of pale morning duns, and caddis, as well as the start of salmon flies and green drakes.

In the Northeast Corner of the Park, flows on the Lamar river rose and muddied briefly this past week after some heavy rain, but are back down to a fishable level and clarity. Expect to see Cutthroat trout rising in this epic valley to pmd's and caddis, but don't be without a few good terrestrial patterns like small hoppers, beetles, and ants here too. 

Slough Creek is another Northeast Corner gem that should be on your radar this week. Water conditions are good, and hatches are settling into their summer rhythm. Pale morning duns, caddis, salmon flies, grey drake spinners, and small terrestrial should be in you batting order when squaring up to take a swing at the impressive Cutthroat trout found here. A slow, stealthy approach will always help in these meandering, glassy meadow waters. And, as always, carry your BEAR SPRAY and know how to use it. 

Peak hatch season in Yellowstone park happens to coincide with the peak tourist season. Millions of visitors flock to the world’s first National Park every summer, and crowded roadways are to be expected. If you’re planning to head in for a day of fishing, we have a few tips to make your visit as enjoyable as possible.

Start Early.

We can’t stress enough the value of an early start to your fishing day in the park even if the Hatch are hoping to find won’t begin until 10 or 11 AM it’s worth getting through the gate in West Yellowstone before 7 AM.

Give yourself plenty of time, and be patient.

Traveling through Yellowstone during peak tourist season can be a slow affair. Be sure to give yourself some extra time to reach your destination so you’re not sitting in a Bison jam while the hatch of the century is rolling off your favorite fishery.

Stay Late.

Whenever possible, plan to spend the whole day in the park. Pack a bunch of food, some chairs, and your favorite beverages. There are tons of great picnic areas and vistas to enjoy a picnic dinner while you wait for the evening rush of traffic to leave the park. Evening fishing is also pretty good on most of our favorite fisheries.

Be a tourist.

Even if you have been in the park a million times, and you’re just on a mission to fish your favorite hatch on your preferred water, take some time to look around. Check out the visitors centers. Grab an ice cream cone. Go gawk at the Upper Falls. There’s a good reason millions of people come back to Yellowstone year after year.

Yellowstone National Park Fishing Permits available online.

Purchasing your online fishing license is now easier than ever. 

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Yellowstone

An angler could spend a lifetime of summers exploring and mastering the roadside waters of Yellowstone Park alone. Rivers like the Madison, Gallatin, Gibbon, Firehole, Lamar, and Yellowstone all have relatively easy access. And that is just a small fraction of the over 200 fishable streams and 45 fishable lakes in the Park.

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