Product Spotlight – Scientific Anglers Sonar Leaders

Product Spotlight – Scientific Anglers Sonar Leaders

This year several of us here at Big Sky Anglers have absolutely fallen in love with Scientific Anglers’ Sonar Leaders for trout Spey (and other applications).  They have become our go-to “sink tip” option for 3wt and lighter Trout Spey rods, and for converting the RIO Trout Spey shooting heads and light Skagit heads into super smooth casting and fishing tools.  They have even found a place in our stillwater angling bag of tricks.  Check it out!

So, what is a Sonar Leader? Simply put, it is Scientific Anglers take on the “coated, tapered leader” concept.  If you are familiar with RIO Versileaders or Airflo Polyleaders, these are similar, with what we feel are a couple of advantages worth noting.  SA’s Sonar Leaders come in 7 and 10-foot long versions (35 and 50 grains respectively), include a welded loop on the butt end, and feature a 25lb test monofilament core.  They come in six densities, including Floating, Hover (1 inch per second sink rate), Intermediate (1.25 inch per second sink rate), Type 3 (3 inch per second sink rate) and Type 6 (6 inch per second sink rate).  Especially cool is the fact that they are labeled with text identifying each one.  For example, the 10ft, 50 grain, Intermediate Sonar leader is labeled with “ SA SONAR LDR 10FT 50GR INT”.

Taper Profile of the 10-foot Sonar Leader

Pros and Cons

As far as what we really like about these Sonar Leaders, let’s just start by reiterating that they are individually labeled with text, right on the leader butt, identifying which leader is which.  No more trying to remember which color leader is which.  No more having to look up which leader has a red loop.  And best of all, no more having to unroll the whole leader just to find out it’s the short one, when you wanted to use the longer one.  Another thing we really like about these are their durability.  They really seem to be holding up to the abuse, with the loops staying intact and the core bonded to the coating nicely.  Lastly, we really like the 25lb test core strength, so that even after a bunch of use, and potential for nicks and scrapes down at the tippet end, there will still be enough extra beef to pull hard on 1x or 2x tippets.

In terms of things we don’t love about these leaders, there really isn’t a whole ton to say.  They do have  the inherent rigging and tippet attachment issues associated with all coated leaders, in that attaching tippets with a blood or surgeons knot is essentially impractical because it quickly uses up the little bit of exposed mono end on the leader.  That said, we hope that the following section on how we like to rig these leaders will help demystify that potential issue.  Other than that, we just wish that SA would add a 12-foot long Sonar Leader option to the 7 and 10-foot long options.

Labeled right on the leader!

Rigging

We mentioned earlier that an inherent issue with coated leaders is adding and replacing tippet over and over again without quickly whittling away at the short, uncoated, knotable section of the leader itself.  We’ve seen many folks adding a loop (like a perfection loop) to the end of the leader, and then loop-to-loop connect their tippet to that.  While effective, we’ve seen that connection fail on more than one occasion, especially with tippets finer than 0x.  What we have found to be equally or more effective, and certainly less prone to wear and failure, is using either a tippet ring or a micro barrel swivel, attached rather permanently to the leader using a 4 or 5 turn clinch knot.  With that securely in place, tippets can be added, removed, changed, and modified many times without shortening the leader.  We have had great luck with both RIO’s 3mm diameter Steelhead Tippet Rings, and with SPro brand Power Swivels in size 8 or 10.  To keep things as light as possible on the Floating and Hover leaders, we tend to use the tippet rings on those Sonar leaders.  On the Intermediate, Type 3, and Type 6 sinking Sonar Leaders, either the SPro micro barrel swivel or the tippet ring will work great. 

Keep in mind that, over time, any rigging will begin to wear, and replacing the tippet ring or micro swivel will be necessary.  So, keep an eye on it, and replace when things are looking warn.  The good news is that the 25lb test mono core can take a ton of abuse before it needs to be re-tied.

When rigging these for Spey applications, we tend to prefer at least 4-feet of added tippet, and often as much as 6 or even 8-feet of added tippet on the floating and hover versions with soft hackles.  For those extra long applications, it can help to actually add a tapered tippet using 3-4 feet of 0x, 1x, or 2x and then blood knotting or surgeons knotting on another 3-4ft of your choice terminal tippet of 2x, 3x, or in some cases maybe even 4x (though we have rarely if ever found 4x necessary while swinging).

Applications

Our favorite application by far for the Sonar leaders has been for trout Spey applications.  In particular, the 10-foot long Sonar Leaders, weighing in at 50 grains, has proven itself to be a fantastic, light sink tip option to attach to Skagit heads that match 3-weight and lighter trout Spey rods.  We’ve found that Skagit heads weighing 300 grains or less have a much easier time turning over a 50 grain Sonar sinking leader than a level sink tip of T-8 (80 grains at 10 feet, or 100 grains at 12 feet).  The tapered front 3 feet of the leaders also seem to smooth out the turnover and take a bit of the clumsy “WHACK” associated with Skagit heads when used to throw lighter flies like small buggers and soft hackle teams.  We’ve also found these leaders to be absolutely dreamy when paired with RIO’s  22ft Trout Spey Shooting Heads.  By adding the tapered Sonar leader it essentially allows the angler to create a sort of multi-tip, 32-foot long Scandi line that is able to smoothly and sweetly turn over soft hackles and smaller streamers with relative ease.  For those who love fishing soft hackles throughout the entire water column, and occasionally throw a small bugger, this could be your dream line/tip kit.  For Spey applications, our most popular Sonar Leaders are the 10-footers in Intermediate, Type 3, and Type 6 sink rates.

Another application that a couple of our staffers have found for these Sonar leaders is on the lakes.  Adding a sinking Sonar leader to the end of a standard floating fly line creates a type of sink tip or “midge tip” that can be very effective for presenting emerging nymph and pupa patterns in an upward curving ach path that exactly imitates the behavior of naturals.  They are also a great option for your slow creepin’ nymph and leech presentations right above the weeds in water less than 6 feet deep.  On stillwater, we tend to gravitate to the 7-foot sonar leaders and definitely have found that looping them to flylines with shorter, more aggressive front tapers results in easier casting, but the 10-footers also have a place.  Adding 6 to 8-foot long, level tippets or tapered fluorocarbon tippets as described above creates necessary separation and invisibility required to fool sometimes fussy stillwater beasts.  For stillwater applications, our favorite Sonar Leaders are the Hover, Intermediate, and Type 3 sink rates.

Patagonia’s Down Sweater Full-Zip Hoody

Ever since I was a wee youngster, down garments have been a staple of my wardrobe.  My down fascination started out with an old school, western style down vest, worn around the age six or seven, in the back yard bagging leaves.  At some point, while hunting waterfowl at Cow’s Head Slough with my Dad and Uncles, a down jacket hung on a sixteen penny nail in our duck blind.  It was tan, probably made back in 1970’s and warm as pie.  On really cold days, this jacket was my blanket, as I would wrap up in it and fall dead asleep on a cot in the back of blind.  I acquired another vintage down jacket (that my folks bought on a trip to San Fransisco in 1969) in my college days.  Molly has tried to take this to Second Wind on several occasions, but I narrowly averted disaster and rescued it.  And then, there is that zero degree 1970’s Sierra Designs down mummy bag, belonging to my Dad, which still has two fee of loft.  If there is one common theme here, besides down feathers, and it’s the fact that down will last a lifetime, if properly taken care of.

The full zip down hoody from Patagonia is one of finest pieces of gear I own.  Why?  Well, read on……

Wearable – yea, this seems like a no-brainer, but some down jackets give the impression of the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man.  The down sweater or down hoody, wear quite well underneath waders and one doesn’t feel restricted at all when rowing or casting.   This jacket was designed for the mountain climber, but the versatility of Patagonia clothing allows it to double or triple for use.  I often wonder if college kids in Bozeman are given this jacket by MSU once they enroll in the four year plan to becoming a better outdoorsman/woman.

The hood – this is my favorite part of jacket.  Hoods, especially down hoods, keep your neck warm and the wind out.  When fishing, spring or fall, I wear the hood up or tight around my neck.  Cold, windy days are even colder when your neckline is exposed.  The draw cord can be cinched up for better visibility when the hood is up –  a great feature for when wearing underneath the SST Jacket.

Packable – when stuffed away, using the interior stretch mesh pocket, this warm layer packs anywhere you want it.  And, weighing in at under a pound (15.2 oz.), you’ll never know it’s even there.   While backpacking into Wyoming’s Alaska Basin, the down hoody was stowed away in my pack all day long, until nightfall.

Suppa, duppa warm – this past fall, while backpacking with Molly throughout the Colorado Plateau, we both carried our Patagonia down jackets.  Morning, evening and from time to time as a pillow, down works like nothing else.  Note: when rowing, this jacket can be too warm, unless of course it’s blowing snow and cold as January in West Yellowstone.   On ski trips in Yellowstone National Park, the down hoody never leaves my pack, it’s my safety net for warmth and I pull it out each time we stop to enjoy an erupting geyser.  On guide trips, this jacket never leaves my drift boat and has been worn by multiple clients on cold days.

The price – okay, this jacket is expensive.  At $250 for the hoody and $200 for the sweater, not everyone can afford it right away…..save your pennies and buy it, as there is no substitute for good gear and good gear is not cheap.  I plan on getting at least ten years out of my hoody (I have two thus far), so that works out to $20-25 per year to stay warm.  The Ironclad Guarantee will help to extend the use of your gear.  My goal is too use a piece of equipment until it falls apart and can’t be fixed, thus reducing my impact on the environment and making the jacket cheaper over time.