Spring Angling & Lodging Packages

Spring Angling & Lodging Packages

The best kept secret in Big Sky Country

Are you itching to get outside and get after some trout fishing this spring? Don’t forget that we have angling packages available throughout the year, but there is no greater value than the packages we offer in the early season.  For dates before Memorial Day we have packages that start out at $1699 for a 2 days’ fishing/3 nights’ lodging, double occupancy.  That’s about $850 per angler for a terrific weekend’s angling pursuit. Stay longer and fish more days if you’d like, we can accommodate and have various packages available.

Our early angling opportunities are primarily located on  the Henry’s Fork in Idaho, and the Madison River in Montana. Both offer great pre-runoff fishing, and are a solid choice prior to Memorial Day. Early season hatches of spring baetis, march browns, caddis, and salmonflies can be found from April through May.

CLICK HERE to read an article by BSA co-owner Jonathan Heames, and learn why he looks forward to Spring fishing on the Henry’s Fork all winter long. 

Our Golden Stone Inn is well designed for the Covid-conscious traveler with individual cabins available and plenty of room to spread out.  Every room has its own entrance to the outside and is well appointed with the comforts you’d expect to enjoy after a day’s fishing.  The Golden Stone Inn is located in West Yellowstone and makes a great starting point for the day’s adventures whether you are headed into Montana’s Madison Valley or to the Henry’s Fork in nearby Idaho. 

For those anglers wishing to take a day to rest and visit Yellowstone National Park  (closed to fishing until the first Saturday of Memorial Day weekend, we can accommodate that as well.  We have a staff guide that offers guided tours into Yellowstone and the early season is an excellent time to visit the park, especially for wildlife viewing.  The cooler weather has the wildlife active during the daytime hours, the larger carnivores are still snacking on winter kills, and the bison are in the midst of their calving season, a dynamic time in our nation’s first national park. 

Call us today at (406) 646-7801 to talk about Spring fishing and lodging packages. Once you experience Spring fishing in Big Sky Country we’re sure you will dream about it all winter too!

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report, 9/10/2020

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report, 9/10/2020


Hello there from West Yellowstone – the Trout Capital of the World! 

We saw more snow and cold overcast days this past week and things now have a chill in the air every morning. The sun poked out in the afternoon on most days, except Monday; when old Man Winter showed up for several hours! There is a fresh layer of the white stuff up high and we seem to be wadering up most days only to strip down to sandals in the boat at some point in the afternoon. Right now, Mother Nature cant quite figure out if it’s Summer or Fall. Our fishing lives are now, more than ever, defined by the weather and the air temperatures throughout the day. If you’re planing a trip here this Fall, now is the time to bring the layers, warm hats and warm gloves. The shop is fully stocked up so feel free to forget all that gear at home and get some new stuff!
The fly shop is OPEN from 7am to 9pm, seven days a week. Our guide staff is on the river daily; the Henry’s Fork in Idaho and the Madison in Montana are having some banner days. The east side of YNP is in shape(watch out for rain storms) and the West side has now cooled off; it’s time to fish the Firehole and the Madison. The fly shop is a clean and healthy environment for both our customers and staff members. There is a sanitation station at the door complete with hand sanitizer and masks if you don’t have one, we are still under Governor’s mandate to wear them when 6′ of social distance isn’t possible indoors; the staff will continue wearing masks for the unforeseen future. Our fishing report is written on the whiteboard right outside the door for your enjoyment, but as always, the freshest report is inside the doors of the fly shop. Stop on by, say hello and we’ll get you taken care of. 

Take care and read on, 
~ Joe

Henry’s Fork – by Jonathan Heames

While the month of September can be a bit fickle and full of transitions, the Fork generally likes this month. Just how you play it down there will depend greatly on what the weather is doing, but generally, the cold nights are enough to spark the fire in the parts of the fishery that have been lying semi-dormant for the past months. September is a month that you can enjoy flyfishing most of the sections of the Henry’s Fork, there is game, one way or the other. 
The upper river is as solid as ever, the Box Canyon comes into a stride that will last until the end of October; the fish are well fed, the weed beds have maximized their production and the maturation of the insect life is at its fullest. The river will slowly and steadily continue to drop and put less water between you and the fish from now until the end of the season. Streamers and nymphs both play well depending on angling preferences, one thing is for sure. The Box is a good bet for a great day’s trout fishing from now until the end of the season.
The Ranch is coming into one of the great times of year for what it is famous for: sight fishing to rising trout. For those uninitiated into the ways of the Railroad Ranch, this is one of the most iconic places the planet to target trout feeding in shallow water. Fall on the Fork is characterized by lots of targets, this is a great time of year to hone the craft of casting to rising trout. Newcomers to the Ranch will find lots of targets on most days, but those looking to target larger fish will have to take a step back and put a careful eye on the scene to find their quarry. Baetis, Pseudocloeons, flying ants, mahogany duns, and pmds are all still on the menu. Be ready to handle any stage of any one of these to have success here. Of course, there are terrestrials present as well when the sun is shining and desperation calls. 
The lower river is again active, and though it’s not as productive as it can be in June, it is definitely worth a day or two of fishing. Weather will play an active roll here in how the game is played, but generally more summery weather will lend itself to hoppers and droppers, the more autumnal days will play better with baetis, mahogany duns and some streamer fishing.
Fall on the Fork is something to enjoy and target, the coming weeks have some terrific angling opportunities!

Yellowstone National Park – by Steve Hoovler

Last week felt like late-summer with a suggestion of fall, this week is undoubtedly early-autumn in the Yellowstone high country. Mornings are no longer “crisp”, they’re cold, there are many more yellow aspen leaves than green ones, and the angle of the sun produces an amber light that makes you want to tilt your head back and soak it all up. 
The forecast calls for a long stretch of “Indian Summer” with morning lows in the upper 20’s-30’s and afternoon highs in the 60’s. Bright sun will dominate this week making for some of the most picturesque days of the season. 

Firehole River

After a long, hot summer break it’s time to start thinking about the world’s strangest trout stream again. Water temperatures have dropped back into the 60’s, and with nights getting longer and the mornings getting frostier, they should continue to fall. The coldest water is always found furthest upstream, in places like Biscuit Basin and Mallard Creek, as they are above the biggest geyser effluents. That will definitely be the case this week when daytime highs are forecasted to get back around 70 degrees.
This is a great time to prospect with a small grasshopper, or swing small soft hackles. You’ll also want to keep an eye out for Baetis mayflies and White Miller caddis. 

Northeast Corner – Slough Cr, Lamar River, Soda Butte Cr

Mornings are cold up in this corner of the park, so there’s no rush to be on the water before late morning. Hoppers and ants should be at the top of the batting order, but keep a keen eye out for Drake, Heptagenia and Baetis mayflies. 

Gallatin River – in YNP

Hopper fishing will be good in this stretch of the Gallatin on warm afternoons. Be prepared to cover a lot of water with your best possible drifts. These fish see far more than their fair share of flies by this point in the season, and are in no mood for a hopper that appears to have an evinrude behind it. Sporadic Baetis mayflies will also be present during the afternoons. It’s a great time to watch carefully for sporadic bank feeders in super-sneaky spots. 

Yellowstone River

As we inch closer to fall, and the inevitable end of the season, fewer and fewer fish remain in the Caldera section of the Yellowstone River below Yellowstone Lake. Naturally, these fish return to the Lake each year to overwinter and prepare for another spring spawning run into the river, and subsequent summer of snacking on hatches. Summer hatches are also waning these days, making this a tougher and tougher fishery from here on out. Some excellent fish still remain in the river, and that will be the case until the season ends, but they will require some extra effort and hunting to find. When you do find a good target you can expect to get their attention with hoppers, ants, and fall hatches of Beatis and Margarita Dun mayflies. As always, sight fishing is paramount here. Fish are spread far and wide making blind fishing a fool’s errand most days. 

Madison River – in YNP

We’re getting closer, week by week and day by day. Water temps are on the fall, and fish are slowly starting to sniff their way upstream. Afternoon water temps are still too warm, especially with hot weather like we have forecasted through the upcoming weekend, but it’s always worth a stop in the mornings and evenings for a quick session to see what’s up. 

Hebgen Lake – by Jonathan Heames

This is likely the final week that Hebgen will put on the final showing of prime gulper fishing opportunities. If the weather stays warm and sunny, however, it could continue into next week…
Plan on a late start for callibaetis hatches, they’re not likely to get going until the air temps get above 60 degrees, which will begin to happen later and later in the day. Wind usually is prohibitive by 1 or 2 o’clock, so keep an eye on the forecast for those days when the wind stays below 10 mph until at least 1 o’clock to have good lake days.
If your planning goes awry, be sure to have along some olive, brown, and black leeches to strip around the Madison Arm, Duck Creek Arm, South Fork Arm and anywhere else you’ve been finding brown trout gulping on the nicer days. Browns are getting cantankerous these days, even in the stillwaters, so be ready to look for them by being ready to strip if they’re not rising. 
Damsel fly activity is worth keeping an eye out for, these late season days when the bug hatches are slim can present plenty of opportunities with the members of the Odonata family. 

Madison River – by Joe Moore

The Madison is sitting at 890 cfs out of Hebgen; just a slight increase from last week. Hoppers are still on the menu but we are getting closer to the end of their reign. We experienced some BWO hatches last week on the overcast days, so be on the lookout for those little guys from here on out. On the cloudy days, we have been dead drifting streamers, rubber legs, various dips, red SJWs and smaller mayfly nymphs. There are a few caddis around as well, and if you can float a #16 Caddis dry fly and get it in all the right spots, you will raise a few fish, that’s for sure. Ants are still a solid player right now and they have made two appearances so far in the past week. Streamer fishing is a great option on the chilly mornings as well. This past week brought more snow and rain; Fall has definitely arrived as we saw 18 degrees just a couple days ago. Feel free to stop by the shop for the most up to date fishing report on the Madison – it changes by the minute down there! 
NOTE: this next part of the report will not change for the next four to five weeks and is super important to one’s success – Overall, the Madison is fishing well throughout the day, but she can be a bit moody at times. There will be sections that are slower than others and parts of the day that fish better. Various lulls throughout the day are to be expected, so pay attention to the bite and keep fishing. The warmer day time air temps and bright sun have these fish a little gun shy, but there is still plenty of game out there to be had.
For those anglers on foot in the Wade Stretch, the key will be to cover water and not spend too much time in one particular place. For those willing to risk it all and wade out into the big river, you will find fish willing to rise out amongst the big boulders and slicks. Be careful! This is best done when wet wading and if you go down, remember to face downstream and get those legs out in front of you. The Madison’s mood seems to change throughout the entire river, if one stretch isn’t fishing well then another probably is. Keep moving and slow down your pace when the fish are biting, speed up when they aren’t. 

River Flows and the Weather Forecast

Below are links to the flows in Montana and Idaho as well as. This time of the year flows and the weather are changing daily, if not by the hour. Click the links below for the most up to date information. 
Montana River Flows
Idaho River Flows
West Yellowstone Weather Forecast

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 8/27/20

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 8/27/20

Hello there from West Yellowstone – the Trout Capital of the World! 

Smokey skies are the new norm this past week. It acts as a filter for the sun and makes the entire day feel pretty darn fishy. We have one local fire in Yellowstone National Park that is burning on Craig Pass south of Old Faithful and the northern California fires are producing most, if not, all the smoke we are experiencing. Fire season has always run alongside late summer trout season, some years are smokier than others, that’s for sure. Rain is in the forecast for this weekend, so that should clear the air and knock the smoke down. All in all, the we are not too far from the first snow, which is hard to believe. These summer days are dwindling, but there is still time to soak up a little more sunshine and fear not, there will be more. Just don’t forget your waders and rain jacket! 
The fly shop is OPEN from 7am to 9pm, seven days a week. Our guide staff is on the river daily; the Henry’s Fork in Idaho and the Madison in Montana are having some banner days. The east side of YNP is in shape and the West side is too warm pushing our interest in the Firehole and Madison aside until early September. The fly shop is a clean and healthy environment for both our customers and staff members. There is a sanitation station at the door complete with hand sanitizer and masks if you don’t have one, we are now under Governor’s mandate to wear them when 6′ of social distance isn’t possible indoors; the staff will continue wearing masks for the unforeseen future. Our fishing report is written on the whiteboard right outside the door for your enjoyment, but as always, the freshest report is inside the doors of the fly shop. Stop on by, say hello and we’ll get you taken care of. 

Take care and read on, 
~ Joe

Yellowstone National Park – by Steve Hoovler

Hints of early autumn are popping up throughout the high country in Yellowstone. The first aspens are showing a touch of yellow, bull elk are beginning to bugle, and fall drakes are hatching. It’s a terrific time to be fishing in the park. 

Northeast Corner – Slough Cr, Lamar River, Soda Butte Cr

Stormy weather is in the forecast on and off again for this week. So, be sure to watch water levels, or check in with us at the shop about water conditions. Fall hatches of drakes and baetis mayflies have brought fish to the surface most days from mid morning to early afternoon. Stormy days can prompt some good hatches of these bugs, but it may be later in the day. On sunny days, once the wind picks up in the afternoon, it’s a hopper and ant game. 

Yellowstone River

As we inch closer to fall, and the inevitable end of the season, fewer and fewer fish remain in the Caldera section of the Yellowstone River below Yellowstone Lake. Naturally, these fish return to the Lake each year to overwinter and prepare for another spring spawning run into the river, and subsequent summer of snacking on hatches. Summer hatches are also waning these days, making this a tougher and tougher fishery from here on out. Some excellent fish still remain in the river, and that will be the case until the season ends, but they will require some extra effort and hunting to find. When you do find a good target you can expect to get their attention with hoppers, ants, and fall hatches of Beatis and Margarita Dun mayflies. As always, sight fishing is paramount here. Fish are spread far and wide making blind fishing a fool’s errand most days. 

Madison River – in YNP

It’s far too early to be talking about fall run fish in the Madison River…but, it’s time to start paying attention to water temps, weather forecasts, and holes in your schedule during the early mornings and late evenings. Undoubtedly, there are already a few studly fish in the river, and the right combination of cool temps, and dark skies could produce a fun session or two in the coming weeks while we wait for the main event later this fall. 

Blue Squiggly Lines

It’s prime time to head off the beaten path, and chase one of the countless Blue Squiggly lines that fill Yellowstone’s backcountry. Break out the map, grab your pack, and start exploring. 

Hebgen Lake – by Jonathan Heames

Gulper fishing is still on the list of great things to do around West Yellowstone with a fly rod in hand, but the end is in sight now. These cold mornings will take their toll on callibaetis and tricos, pushing the hatch later into the day as September rolls along. It’s not too common to have great gulper fishing after the 10th or so, keep an eye on the weather with a strong preference for windless days that warm quickly.
Callibaetis are the strongest hatch throughout the lake, but be on the lookout for flying ants, midges, and tricos. Now is a very good time to look for damselfly activity in the early afternoon, the weed beds have grown up and are covered up in these little blue and red guys. If you notice trout feeding recklessly but occasionally in the area you’re fishing, try sneaking up and placing a damsel adult in the area. Let it sit for a bit and twitch it every once in a while. Usually, right when I begin to think they’re not going to eat it, they do.
Have fun out there!

Madison River – by Joe Moore

The Madison has dropped quite a bit this past week and is sitting at 953 cfs out of Hebgen, hopefully these flows will remain stable for the time being. The hopper bite is still happening, be patience during the mornings and pray for sunshine in the afternoons; the river needs to warm up and there is definitely a window of hoppertunity after lunch. On the cloudy days, we have been dead drifting streamers, rubber legs, various dips and smaller mayfly nymphs. There are a few caddis around as well, and if you can float a #16 Caddis dryfly and get it in all the right spots, you will raise a few fish, that’s for sure. Our guides are down on the Madison every single day right now and have been for all summer.  Feel free to stop by the shop for the most up to date fishing report on the Madison – it changes by the minute down there! 
NOTE: this next part of the report will not change for the next four to five weeks and is super important to one’s success – Overall, the Madison is fishing well throughout the day, but she can be a bit moody at times. There will be sections that are slower than others and parts of the day that fish better. Various lulls throughout the day are to be expected, so pay attention to the bite and keep fishing. The warmer day time air temps and bright sun have these fish a little gun shy, but there is still plenty of game out there to be had.
For those anglers on foot in the Wade Stretch, the key will be to cover water and not spend too much time in one particular place. For those willing to risk it all and wade out into the big river, you will find fish willing to rise out amongst the big boulders and slicks. Be careful! This is best done when wet wading and if you go down, remember to face downstream and get those legs out in front of you. The Madison’s mood seems to change throughout the entire river, if one stretch isn’t fishing well then another probably is. Keep moving and slow down your pace when the fish are biting, speed up when they aren’t. 

Henry’s Fork of the Snake – by Jonathan Heames

As we near the end of August, fall on the Fork begins to change the way we think about fishing. Hot summer days with sparse hatches of callibaetis, pmds, caddis, punctuated by terrestrial activity will give way to cold, misty mornings with mahogany duns and baetis on the water. Some of the lower river options will begin to fish well again as the month progresses.
The Box Canyon remains the workhorse of the river, capable of pumping out quality fishing days for quality trout week after week. Fishing has been overall very good in there, flows seem high, likely because of the weed growth displacing the water. Look for fish tight to rock structures and think about using tungsten flies that will get there without external split shot if possible. Perdigon style nymphs and zebra midges are a good place to start. Takes are as light as ever, be ready to set on the slightest of indications. The Box Canyon is a lesson in setting the hook with a nymph rig, there’s no time for doubt!
The upper Ranch has had fairly sparse bug activity and sparse rising activity. Perseverance will pay off but don’t expect to find a trout sipping steadily, you’ll need to mark where you see the rise and present the fly to that spot based on memory. It’s a good idea to have a few small hoppers with you in addition to flying ants, pmds, caddis, and some callibaetis spinners.
The lower Ranch has more bug activity centered around the influxes of spring water. These fish are in the cold water but they are techy and difficult to catch. They make for some great sport this time of year. Pmds, dark caddis in a 14 and 18, callibaetis, flying ants, and some hoppers will round out the quiver nicely here.
The canyon country from Riverside Campground on down to Warm River will fish well with dry/dropper rigs and streamers for those looking for a wilderness float experience with plenty of trout involved. Warm River to Ashton consistently is providing anglers with a satisfying experience, usually one with good numbers of opportunities mixed in there. 
The lower river below Ashton reservoir will have spotty opportunity now, mornings are a fair bet, but after noon, conditions will determine how much longer you can stick around. A hot and sunny day will put these trout in hiding after lunchtime. Hoppers, droppers, and streamers are a good program here for the next week. 
Weeds in the system haven’t been very bad, but as the river begins to drop they will get worse. Be prepared for weed clumps and mats to be drifting through the water column and embrace that you will need to deal with them. Do your best to avoid the drifting clumps while playing fish, remember to keep a deep bend in your rod and maximize pressure to keep those trout on the line. If your dry fly isn’t floating very well, bring it in, clean the weeds off, blow out the moisture and re-dress. A high line speed backcast does a lot to keep things clean and fishy out there. 

River Flows and the Weather Forecast

Below are links to the flows in Montana and Idaho as well as. This time of the year flows and the weather are changing daily, if not by the hour. Click the links below for the most up to date information. 
Montana River Flows
Idaho River Flows
West Yellowstone Weather Forecast

The Heart of the Season

The Heart of the Season

As we approach the middle of July each year, I tend to feel a little bit of anxiety as I begin to consider the bewildering diversity of fishing opportunities that surround us here in West Yellowstone.  As a guide, now is when I begin to have almost TOO MANY good options and the difficult thing can be to decide which one to take each day.  As an angler, I begin to think of all the places that are still on my list after a lifetime of exploring Yellowstone country and I grapple with the reality that I might only have time enough to tick just one more off of what seems to be a growing, rather than shrinking list.

We at Big Sky Anglers choose to live here in West Yellowstone because of its incredible diversity of water types and virtually endless fishing options for anglers of all skill levels and interests.  We not only live here because of the opportunities found to engage all anglers as customers but also because we, as anglers, remain engaged in angling pursuits here even after a lifetime of flyfishing in the area.  Draw a simple 100 mile radius around West Yellowstone on any map and you will have encapsulated more squiggly blue lines and world class fisheries than can be found in a 100 mile radius just about anywhere else on the globe.  This place both keeps us on our toes and inspires us.  We love to share it with others and look forward to chances to introduce anglers to new experiences.

The middle of July represents to us the heart of our season.  It is exactly in the middle of what we would call our prime time, which arguably ranges from the beginning of May through the beginning of October.  Summertime dry fly fishing is in full effect, good hatches are occurring during the daylight hours and good evening fishing can be found with regular spinner falls and caddis emergences.  At this point in the year, there is more quality fishable water around us than at any other time.  Terrific fishing can be found on the Henry’s Fork and Henry’s Lake in Idaho, Montana’s Madison, Gallatin, Missouri, Yellowstone Rivers as well as many of the region’s stillwaters, of which Hebgen sits atop our list due both proximity to the shop and the angling diversity it offers.  Yellowstone National Park, with the exception of the waters warmed by geyser influence like the Firehole and Madison, numerically dominates the area’s options and great trout fishing can be found in any quadrant.  Many of the high country and back country streams are just now coming into shape for their short but productive time of year. 

Perhaps foolishly, I have decided to attempt to summarize some of the option available to us during the Heart of our season.

Let’s start in Idaho.  The Henry’s Fork is perhaps the single most diverse river in our lineup.  It has everything from technical spring creek fishing on a large scale to wild and seldom traveled wilderness canyon sections that offer a high quality outdoor experience on just about any day of the summer.  Though some of the fantastic fishing that we experience in June on the Fork has shut down due to high irrigation demand and high summer temperatures in the valley, the river fishes consistently well all the way to the town of Ashton.  Just below the Island Park dam the remarkably consistent fishery of the Box Canyon is entering its prime season, which will extend through the middle of October.  The Railroad Ranch has good hatches throughout the month of July before shifting into more sparse and technical August fishing with fewer bugs and terrestrials.  Evening fishing is still high on the list of great ideas here at this time and will continue to be so until the end of the month or first weeks of August.  The canyon country below the Ranch and the water just outside of the caldera remains highly oxygenated and offers consistent fishing almost every day for beginner and intermediate level anglers.  Henry’s Lake begins to weed up and the hardware/trolling traffic begins to lighten up a bit, leaving most of the water to fly anglers.  This will continue into August and the fly opportunities continue to increase from now through the middle of October.  The Henry’s Fork provides on very large piece of a large puzzle of opportunity at this time of year.

In the portion of southwestern Montana that is immediately around West Yellowstone, the Madison River and Hebgen Lake dominate the list of options.  The Madison is now at its most active time of year and this represents the heart of the dry fly season on one of our nation’s finest dry fly fisheries.  Good hatches provide great action for anglers of all skill levels throughout July, and the classically wide-open landscape of this iconic Montana river lends itself to the production of a great many terrestrial insects during the month of August.  Water temperatures stay consistently cool throughout the heat of summer here, especially now that the Hebgen dam has been repaired, and dry fly fishing remains an excellent option through the end of August.  If the Madison is on your list of rivers to experience, these next two months are some of the best times to experience it.  Hebgen Lake is a robust Stillwater fishery, perhaps best known in the flyfishing world for its incredible hatches of tricos and callibaetis, as well the large trout that gobble the spinners from the surface of the water in easy rhythm, those we refer to as “gulpers”.  This is some of the most entertaining Stillwater fishing available to fly anglers, and it is located right in our backyard.  If you are a repeat visitor to Yellowstone country with a fly rod in hand, experiencing “gulper” fishing is something that should most definitely be on your list.  Hebgen also offers an incredible variety of subsurface fishing opportunities throughout the summer, similar to Henry’s Lake.

There are over 1,800 miles of squiggly blue lines in Yellowstone National Park and just over 220 lakes within its boundary.   Virtually all of this water holds trout of some sort: Rainbows, Browns, Brooks, Lakers and Cutthroats, both Yellowstone and West Slope.  There are also Grayling and Mountain Whitefish to be found.  Outside of the waters that directly receive geyser effluent (the Firehole River, portions of the Gibbon, and the Madison), most of this water is in prime shape and is now ready to be explored.  In the Northwest, the Gallatin and Gardner Rivers are in their prime and will remain so through the end of August.  In the Southwest, the more remote river systems beckon the backountry angler with some fine fishing, hot spring soaking, and waterfall exploring opportunities.  In the southeast, lies the headwaters of two of the United States’ great rivers, the Yellowstone and the Snake.  Much of this water hasn’t been fishable until just now due to regulations and runoff conditions. The Yellowstone and Lamar Rivers, as well as Slough and Soda Butte Creek in the northeast are now in shape and begin to draw anglers from around the globe.  The open Serengeti-like terrain of this corner of the park provides not only exciting fishing but also some of Yellowstone National Park’s best wildlife watching.  Now is the time to begin fishing in earnest the bulk of the water in the crown jewel of our National Park system. 

Whether you are bound for Yellowstone country with plans to fish every day or have come to simply experience this part of the world and would like to fish for a day or two, the next two months offer some of the most consistent and diverse fishing to be found in this remarkable region surrounding West Yellowstone.  We are truly and fortunately, located at the epicenter of trout fishing in the American West. 

BSA’s 4th Annual Community Appreciation Celebration – June 27, 2020

BSA’s 4th Annual Community Appreciation Celebration – June 27, 2020

Well folks, we’ve held out as long as possible to update everyone about our summer community appreciation event. Formerly known as the Grand Opening Celebration. Turns out, those banners finally wore out. The simple fact is, now is not the time to invite all of our best friends, family members, and the entire BSA community into the flyshop for a party and BBQ. That said, we are not interested in cancelling the celebration all together, so we have been wracking our brains for ways to bring our community together in other, safer ways this summer.

So, what do we have up our sleeve?

First of all, the flyshop will be open on June 27th for regular hours, so please feel free to stop in and say hi. We plan to run some great sales, giveaways, and maybe a game or two.

The rest of this event, however, will be held online, taking advantage of the incredible technology we have at our disposal that helped keep us together and sane during lockdown. SO…

 

Join us ONLINE for Big Sky Anglers FOURTH ANNUAL Community Appreciation Celebration – 

A celebration of summer, friends, family, and fly fishing.

Saturday, June 27th, 2020


 
Read on below for a listing and schedule of guests and events.  Keep fishing, keep smiling, and we hope to see everyone at a bigger and better party at the flyshop in June 2021!
 
Best,
Joe Moore, Justin Spence, and Jonathan Heames
Owners, Big Sky Anglers
 

 

Special Guests and Events Schedule

We hope to add a couple more events in the coming week, so please check back in!

Saturday, June 27th

On Instagram @bigskyanglers

If you haven’t started following us on Instagram, now might be the right time to do it.  We will be live on Instagram throughout the day, with IG Live videos, Q&A, special guests, fly tying, giveaways, sales, and more.    

2 PM Mountain Time – Jonathan and Steve will be chatting live with Benjamin Beale of El Encuentro Fly Fishing.  Watch for the IG Live announcement in your Stories via @bigskyanglers and @elencuentroflyfishing

4 PM Mountain Time – Justin chats live with the Patagonia Nomads, direct from San Martin de Los Andes, Argentina.  Watch for the IG Live announcement in your Stories via @bigskyanglers and @patagonianomads.arg  

6 PM Mountain Time – Justin chats live with our good mate and Kiwi fishing guide Ronan Creane, direct from the South Island of New Zealand.  Watch for the IG Live announcement in your Stories via @bigskyanglers and @ronan_creane  

8 PM Mountain Time – BSA’s Matt Klara on the tying bench sharing a few tips and tricks for tying some of his favorite stillwater and Trout Spey patterns.  Watch for the IG Live announcement in your Stories via @bigskyanglers

On the Online Flyshop

For one day only, we will be running a killer sale via our online fly shop – https://www.bigskyanglers.shop/ – As part of the celebration we are also running a 1-day-only 20% off FLASH SALE on both the BSA Logo Simms Challenger Hoody and our BSA Woven Label Trucker Hats all day long on June 27th via our Online Fly Shop. To take advantage of this deal, simply add the items to your cart and use the code BSAJUNE27 at checkout.

In the Flyshop

While we aren’t hosting any formal gatherings we encourage folks to stop by and say hello if you are in town. Sales and giveaways will be on deck. Fishing stories and lies are always free.