A fine river access point.

Pictured above is the  new boat ramp below Reynolds Pass Bridge.   It is still under a bit of snow, but will be open by the 21st of May – Opening Day.  I took a walk yesterday afternoon, upstream from here, and checked out this section of the river.  There were trout rising to midges along the way and I saw a few redds as well.   Several good sized rainbows where hanging around the redds, running the pool.  I watched a rather large brown trout for a moment, but he soon felt my presence and spooked out.   Snow still abounds on the cabin side of the river all the way to Quake Lake.   The river is gin clear and looks very sexy.   Our weather forecast for the next 30 days is cool and wet.  What does that mean?  Well,  the Madison should be clear on the 21st, but there should be some muddy water shorty after that.  Hopefully, by the first of June, the Madison will be blown out and our mountains will be loosing some of the wet, heavy white stuff.  Expect to see snow in the high country for all of  July and most of August.  

Ross A. Merigold - a guide & flytyer on the Upper Madison

Along the way upstream, I paused a moment to watch a trout rise in Merigold’s Pool.  Ross lived at the Slide Inn in the 70’s and 80’s and guided clients on the Upper Madison.  The R.A.M. Caddis is his pattern and variations of it have produced solid results for years.  The Serendipity is one of these patterns and its original name was the Green Devil, but also tied in brown, and red.  Click here to read a very interesting account of the origins of said pattern, apparently the real story behind the fly.   My good friend Steve Driskill spent many nights camped next to Ross in the 80’s and has shown me other variations of this pattern, but he made me swear not to show anyone.    Fly tyers are a funny bunch and don’t always want to share little secrets which took hours of trail and error to figure out.  Can you blame them?