Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 8/6/2020

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 8/6/2020

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Hello there from West Yellowstone – the Trout Capital of the World!
The Dog Days of Summer are here, that’s for sure. The Greeks coined this phrase way back when and it refers to the timeframe of late July to early September when dogs and men could be driven mad just from the extreme heat alone. While we may not be driven mad from that nowadays, the fishing might drive you mad depending on your luck as well as where and when you have been angling. Fishing early in the day is the best approach right now as the hot summer afternoon temps are bringing river temps above 65 degrees on some of the local rivers. Taking time to revive a fish caught in the afternoon hours of the day will pay dividends to your fishing karma, no doubt. Like we mentioned last week, taking a hike to the higher mountain streams of YNP, Montana and Idaho is never a bad idea. While you’ll find smaller fish in those streams or lakes, they tend to be a bit more eager to eat your offerings.

The fly shop is OPEN from 7am to 9pm, seven days a week. Our guide staff is on the river daily; the Henry’s Fork in Idaho and the Madison in Montana are having some banner days. The east side of YNP is in shape and the West side is too warm pushing our interest in the Firehole and Madison aside until late August. The fly shop is a clean and healthy environment for both our customers and staff members. There is a sanitation station at the door complete with hand sanitizer and masks if you don’t have one, we are now under Governor’s mandate to wear them when 6′ of social distance isn’t possible indoors; the staff will continue wearing masks for the unforeseen future. Our fishing report is written on the whiteboard right outside the door for your enjoyment, but as always, the freshest report is inside the doors of the fly shop. Stop on by, say hello and we’ll get you taken care of.

Take care and read on, 
~ Joe

Yellowstone National Park – by Joe Moore

Lamar River

The Lamar is back to gin clear and fishable, but it’s been getting a little on the warm side for river temps later in the day. We’ve seen some mid to high 60 degree temps here lately so its been best to fish the river early and call it day before the heat really sets in. If you do fish in the later afternoon and evening hours, take good care of those Yellowstone Cutts and spend some time reviving them before returning them to faster current. As for the bugs, terrestrials are the name of the game. When in doubt, feed em’ a beetle! Also be on the look out for spruce moths in the treed sections of the Lamar River. Many a day can be saved with the moth when they are out and about. The USGS chart online is always a helpful tool to follow flows on the Lamar. A quick call to the shop, or better yet a visit, for up to date info on water conditions is always a strong move too.

Yellowstone River – in YNP

Flows are good, hatches are in full swing, and the river has more Cutthroat Trout in it than we’ve seen in a long time. It’s prime time to be stalking these trophy fish with a dry fly. As always, this is a technical, sight-fishing game. Be prepared to hunt for your targets, and plan a stealthy approach. PMD’s, Green Drakes, Golden Stones, and caddis will have fish looking up, but these big, old fish have been around the caldera a time or two, and require a good presentation and perfect drift.

Yellowstone Lake

It’s time look for Callibaetis spinner falls on any calm, warm mornings. The shallow weed flats near Bridge Bay, Gull Point, and Sand Point all provide opportunities for the wade fisherman to cast dry flies to cruising Cutts.

Slough Creek

This past week, the section below the Campground down a mile or so was closed off due to bear activity on a bison carcass. By the time you read this newsletter, that bear has most likely moved on to eating berries or rolling logs on the look out for ants and grubs. As always, you will want to be prepared with Bear Spray anytime you fish Slough, especially in the backcountry meadows.

If you are up for the hike, the backcountry meadows of Slough Creek are entering their prime. It’s a good idea to bring along a water filter and not pack a day’s worth of water; the weight alone will break your back! Water conditions are perfect, and mid summer hatches have Slough’s resident Cutts looking to the surface. Expect to see PMD’s, Gray Drake’s, Golden Stones, and Caddis. Hoppers, ants and beetles are patterns not to forget when you need to “throw the box” at the picky risers. If you havent tried sight nymphing, this is a fantastic way to fool these fish all the while upping your game.

Biting flies are still around and at time they are Biblical. So, make sure you have your favorite bug dope on hand. If you don’t have a favorite, stop by the shop and pick up some of ours, Ultrathon. We have it in both the lotion and spray, and have found nothing better short of full strength deet to deter those sinister little bugs. Good enough for the US Armed Forces, good enough for us, this is the stuff that works.

Gallatin River – in YNP

Warm weather brings out the best in the park waters of the Gallatin. This is a great afternoon or evening option after an am session on the Madison. Not much has changed here bug wise since last week. PMD’s, caddis, yellow sallies, Green Drakes, Flavs, and the last of the Golden Stones are all on the menu. Spruce Moths have shown up in decent numbers, so be sure to have a few of those as well.

Gallatin River – outside YNP

Great fishing continues on downstream through Big Sky and the canyon waters. Afternoon action is slower here than up in the Park waters, but morning and evening sessions will produce good numbers of fish rising to Size #14-16 rusty spinners and caddis. Spruce Moths have shown up in decent numbers, so be sure to have a few of those as well.

Hebgen Lake – by Matt Klara

Gulper season is now in full swing on Hebgen Lake. Callibaetis and tricos have the fish looking up during calm or lightly wind ruffled conditions. In the timeless words of Wayne Campbell and Garth Algar. “GAME OOOOON!”

Not much change on the chironomid scene from last week – fish seem to be focusing in on smaller offerings, in sizes 16 and even 18. Likewise, if you are chasing gulpers, but the wind starts messing with you, don’t be afraid to drop sub surface and slowly retrieve a Callibaetis nymph.
Damselflys are a true sign of summer. They entertain us with their colors, skillful flight, and seemingly endless interest in the top 1/3 of our flyrods when we are retrieving a fly slowly. Take the hint. If nothing else is really happening, strip a damsel nymph!

Madison River – by Joe Moore

The flows below Hebgen Dam have been stable this week and she’s still sitting at 1170 cfs. Way downstream at Varney Bridge, the river is moving along at 1700 cfs. We are super thankful around here to see these flows this high as hot daytime temps in the valley are in the forecast for the next 10 days. Long floats and rolling dry flies in the middle of the river will be important. Watch out for those late afternoon thunderstorms and be mindful of the lighting!

NOTE: this next part of the report will not change for the next four to five weeks and is super important to one’s success – Overall, the Madison is fishing well throughout the day, but she can be a bit moody at times. There will be sections that are slower than others and parts of the day that fish better. Various lulls throughout the day are to be expected, so pay attention to the bite and keep fishing. The warmer day time air temps and bright sun have these fish a little gun shy, but there is still plenty of game out there to be had.

For those anglers on foot in the Wade Stretch, the key will be to cover water and not spend too much time in one particular place. For those willing to risk it all and wade out into the big river, you will find fish willing to rise out amongst the big boulders and slicks. Be careful! This is best done when wet wading and if you go down, remember to face downstream and get those legs out in front of you. The Madison’s mood seems to change throughout the entire river, if one stretch isn’t fishing well then another probably is. Keep moving and slow down your pace when the fish are biting, speed up when they aren’t.

Terrestrials are becoming more important by the day. Have a solid stock of beetles, ants and hoppers in your box. Epeorus mayflies have made an appearance as well and nymphing an emerger is a sneaky little trick. Nocturnal Stone flies, fished early in the morning and late in the evening can offer some fantastic takes, just be ready and let the fish eat it. Fishing a cinnamon colored parachute, Jojo’s PMD, the Parashuck PMD, Riffle Riser Crip, X Caddis, Tom’s Caddis, Comparabuzz, rusty parachute, Missing Link and, Thunder Thighs Hopper, Lightning Legs Hopper and Jojo’s Ant are on the menu. Trout are definitely looking up for ants and hoppers so be prepared with those after in the afternoon hours. Fishing subsurface with rubber leg stone flies, biot stones, Prince nymphs, tungsten PT’s, olive Arizona Hare’s Ear, Hare & Copper, Dips and of course a smattering of different perdigon nymph patterns will produce if you need to go there. Take a few moments to observe the river and watch the natural world unfold. It will show you the way if you let it.

Henry’s Fork of the Snake – by Joe Moore

The Ranch has been fishing pretty darn well during the high water with mayfly spinners; a smattering of Callibaetis, Tricos, Rusty Spinners and Grey Drakes should do the trick if presented correctly the first go around. It’s a fantastic idea to take a sunrise walk along the Fork right now to optimize your time on the water. By mid-day, things are heating up quickly and those rainbows generally don’t like bright sun. Don’t forget those caddis, ants, beetles and hopper patterns as well now that we have entered terrestrial time. The honey ants have not shown up just yet, but any day now that could happen. When it does, being knee deep in the Henry’s Fork is the place to be. The banks are your go to spots but wading, carefully that is, out into the river is a solid option as well to find those mid river risers. The flows out of the IP Reservoir are running 1320 cfs, that is still high and one needs to be extra careful when stepping away from the banks.

The Box Canyon will continue to fish as it slowly returns to non-irrigating flows. That said, it’s still pretty high at 1320 cfs. Water clarity has improved and the trout are still biting. Towards the end of the float be on the look for Grey Drake spinners and sneaky rising fish upstream of the boat ramp. So, it’s time to get techy again with those nymph rigs. 4x or 4.5x Flouro, lengthen out that leader, use a 90 degree rigging and dig out the tungsten Zebra Midges, Bullet Quills, and Red Necks.

River Flows and the Weather Forecast

Below are links to the flows in Montana and Idaho as well as. This time of the year flows and the weather are changing daily, if not by the hour. Click the links below for the most up to date information. 
Montana River Flows
Idaho River Flows
West Yellowstone Weather Forecast

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 7/30/2020

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 7/30/2020

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Hello there from West Yellowstone – the Trout Capital of the World! 

It’s late July; while we are still rowing the Madison and Henry’s Fork our mind leads us to other locales like the Hebgen Lake and off the beaten path places in Yellowstone’s Backcountry. The angling options around West Yellowstone is unmatched to just about anywhere in the World; and we’ve tried hard to find it! Spending the day on one of our local lakes chasing gulpers or strapping on a backpack and taking off down the trail in Yellowstone National Park in search of solitude and rising trout is truly what fly fishing is all about. The game of sight fishing requires practice and dedication, some days you’re the hammer and some days you’re the nail. Regardless, the pursuit is what drives us to keep going back and getting better at all aspects of fly fishing. Along the way, the total experience is what all of us are after and it’s a huge part of what we offer at Big Sky Anglers. 
The fly shop is OPEN from 7am to 9pm, seven days a week. Our guide staff is on the river daily; the Henry’s Fork in Idaho and the Madison in Montana are having some banner days. The east side of YNP has shaped up and the West side is too warm pushing our interest in the Firehole and Madison aside until late August. The fly shop is a clean and healthy environment for both our customers and staff members. There is a sanitation station at the door complete with hand sanitizer and masks if you don’t have one, we are now under Governor’s mandate to wear them when 6′ of social distance isn’t possible indoors; the staff will continue wearing masks for the unforeseen future. Our fishing report is written on the whiteboard right outside the door for your enjoyment, but as always, the freshest report is inside the doors of the fly shop. Stop on by, say hello and we’ll get you taken care of. 

Take care and read on, 
~ Joe

Yellowstone National Park – by Steve Hoovler

Lamar River 

A stubborn shot of scuzzy weather, complete with lightning, thunder, hail, and heavy rain, swept through the area this week bringing up flows and adding color to the water on the Lamar River. Prior to the rain event flows were hovering around 500 cfs. They peaked yesterday at close to 700cfs. Overall, that’s not a huge bump, and the situation is improving almost as quickly as it deteriorated. As a rule, when trying to judge the water conditions in the Northeast Corner, once flows return to the level they were at before the weather event clarity will be good too. The USGS chart online is always a helpful tool to follow flows on the Lamar. A quick call to the shop, or better yet a visit, for up to date info on water conditions is always a strong move too. 
Warm, dry weather is back in the forecast for the next week. That’s good news for the Lamar where eager, Yellowstone Cutts will likely be feeding on hoppers, ants, PMDs, and caddis. 

Yellowstone River – in YNP

Flows are good, hatches are in full swing, and the river has more Cutthroat Trout in it than we’ve seen in a long time. It’s prime time to be stalking these trophy fish with a dry fly. As always, this is a technical, sight-fishing game. Be prepared to hunt for your targets, and plan a stealthy approach. PMD’s, Green Drakes, Golden Stones, and caddis will have fish looking up, but these big, old fish have been around the caldera a time or two, and require a good presentation and perfect drift. 

Yellowstone Lake

It’s time look for Callibaetis spinner falls on any calm, warm mornings. The shallow weed flats near Bridge Bay, Gull Point, and Sand Point all provide opportunities for the wade fisherman to cast dry flies to cruising Cutts. 

Slough Creek

As we enter the peak of our summer season the backcountry meadows of Slough Creek are entering their prime. Water conditions are perfect, and mid summer hatches have Slough’s resident Cutts looking to the surface. Expect to see PMD’s, Gray Drake’s, Golden Stones, and Caddis. 
As always, you will want to be prepared with Bear Spray anytime you fish Slough, especially in the backcountry meadows. 
Biting flies are still around. So, make sure you have your favorite bug dope as well. If you don’t have a favorite, stop by the shop and pick up some of ours, Ultrathon. We have it in both the lotion and spray, and have found nothing better short of full strength deet to deter those sinister little bugs. Good enough for the US Armed Forces, good enough for us, this is the stuff that works.

Gallatin River – in YNP

Warm weather brings out the best in the park waters of the Gallatin. This is a great afternoon or evening option after an am session on the Madison. Not much has changed here bug wise since last week. PMD’s, caddis, yellow sallies, Green Drakes, Flavs, and the last of the Golden Stones are all on the menu. 

Gallatin River – outside YNP

Great fishing continues on downstream through Big Sky and the canyon waters. Afternoon action is slower here than up in the Park waters, but morning and evening sessions will produce good numbers of fish rising to Size #14-16 rusty spinners and caddis. 

Hebgen Lake – By Steve Hoovler and Matt Klara 

We’re transitioning into prime Gulper season on Hebgen Lake. Still wondering what the hell we’re talking about? Swing by the shop for more info about one of the most exciting games you can play with a fly rod. 
On the chironomid scene, fish seem to be focusing in on smaller offerings, in sizes 16 and even 18 lately. If you are chasing gulpers, but the wind starts messing with you, don’t be afraid to drop sub surface and slowly retrieve a Callibaetis nymph. These sporty swimmers often garner more than their fair share of attention from the trout, and grabs can be surprisingly hard, so keep a light grip on your line and/or angle your rod tip slightly off to the side of the line to protect against breakoffs! Damsels are also in the air, under the water, and on the trout’s menu these days, so remember those as another potential option if the gulpers don’t materialize for you.

Madison River – by Joe Moore

The flows below Hebgen Dam bounced up again this past week and we are now sitting at 1170 cfs. Way downstream at Varney Bridge, the river is moving along at 1660 cfs. We are super thankful around here to see these flows bump up as hot daytime temps in the valley are coming for the next 10 days. Long floats and rolling dry flies in the middle of the river will be important. NOTE: this next part of the report will not change for the next four to five weeks and is super important to one’s success – Overall, the Madison is fishing well throughout the day, but she can be a bit moody at times. There will be sections that are slower than others and parts of the day that fish better. Various lulls throughout the day are to be expected, so pay attention to the bite and keep fishing. The warmer day time air temps and bright sun have these fish a little gun shy, but there is still plenty of game out there to be had. For those anglers on foot in the wade stretch, the key will be to cover water and not spend too much time in one particular place. The Madison’s mood seems to change throughout the entire river, if one stretch isn’t fishing well then another probably is. Keep moving and slow down your pace when the fish are biting, speed up when they aren’t. 
Caddis are still hatching but their importance is dwindling for the time being. Epeorus mayflies have made an appearance as well and nymphing an emerger is a sneaky little trick. Noctural Stone flies, fished early in the morning and late in the evening can offer some fantastic takes, just be ready and let the fish eat it. Fishing a cinnamon colored parachute, Jojo’s PMD, the Parashuck PMD, Riffle Riser Crip, X Caddis, Tom’s Caddis, Comparabuzz, rusty parachute, Missing Link and, Thunder Thighs Hopper, Lightning Legs Hopper and Jojo’s Ant are the soup du jour. Trout are definitely looking up for ants and hoppers so be prepared with those after in the afternoon hours. Fishing subsurface with rubber leg stone flies, biot stones, Prince nymphs, tungsten PT’s, olive Arizona Hare’s Ear, Hare & Copper, Dips and of course a smattering of different perdigon nymph patterns will produce if you need to go there. Take a few moments to observe the river and watch the natural world unfold. It will show you the way if you let it. 

Henry’s Fork of the Snake – by Steve Hoovler

One of my favorite aspects of fishing the Ranch is the slow, methodical pace that the river demands in order to be successful – the waiting, the hunting, the observing. Whether it’s the traffic on HWY 20, the currents of the river as they leave Box Canyon, or the rhythm of a rainbow trout rising to freshly fallen spinners, everything slows down in Last Chance. It’s a place where time almost stands still, where your patience, thoroughness, and finesse are rewarded, where we get the all too uncommon opportunity to sit and reflect. There’s no rush. 
As this crazy summer bleeds into August we’re entering my favorite time of year on the Ranch. The Hollywood Hatches of June and July will be long gone, and so too will the crowds.  It’s been a busy, uncertain season in Big Sky Country, and I for one am looking forward to some slow, timeless days wandering, sitting, and fishing in the Railroad Ranch. 
In the meantime, summertime irrigation demand has passed its peak, and flows are stepping down from Island Park Reservoir. Morning spinner falls, and PMD emergences have been good, as well as isolated Callibaetis spinner falls, and caddis. Hoppers and Honey Ants are imminent. 
The Box Canyon will continue to fish well as it slowly returns to non-irrigating flows. Water clarity should also improve. So, it’s time to get techy again with those nymph rigs. Bring back the 4x or 4.5x Flouro, and dig out the tungsten Zebra Midges, Bullet Quills, and Red Necks. 

River Flows and the Weather Forecast

Below are links to the flows in Montana and Idaho as well as. This time of the year flows and the weather are changing daily, if not by the hour. Click the links below for the most up to date information. 
Montana River Flows
Idaho River Flows
West Yellowstone Weather Forecast

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 7/23/2020

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 7/23/2020


Hello there from West Yellowstone – the Trout Capital of the World!

Nostalgia set in last week as Justin, my Dad and I headed over to Hayden Valley in search native cutthroat downstream of Yellowstone Lake. Years ago, back in 92′, my Dad brought me to West Yellowstone on a fishing trip of a life time. I have fond memories of fishing yellow Humpies to rising cutthroat near Buffalo Ford, now known as Nez Perce Ford. Back then, one could fish dry flies all day and catch more cutthroat than you could shake a stick at. It was on the Yellowstone that I was forced to perfect the reach cast and stack mending as well as fishing dry flies up stream. While cutties aren’t known to be tricky fish, they will become smart once fished over without a drag free drift. We have entered the time of the year when upping one’s game will greatly increase one’s chances. Practice casting before your trip! 

The fly shop is OPEN from 7am to 9pm, seven days a week. Our guide staff is on the river daily; the Henry’s Fork in Idaho, the Madison in Montana and the Missouri River in Craig are all fishing quite well. The east side of YNP is shaping up as the West side begins to warm pushing our interest in the Firehole and Madison aside until late August. The fly shop is a clean and healthy environment for both our customers and staff members. There is a sanitation station at the door complete with hand sanitizer and masks if you choose to wear one; the staff will continue wearing masks for the unforeseen future. Our fishing report is written on the whiteboard right outside the door for your enjoyment, but as always, the freshest report is inside the doors of the fly shop. Stop on by, say hello and we’ll get you taken care of. 

Take care and read on, 
~ Joe 

Yellowstone National Park – by Steve Hoovler

The mercury has been on the rise this week across Big Sky Country bringing water temps up, and slowing down the fishing in many low lying areas. This is the time to look to the cold, high country waters in Yellowstone Park for consistent fishing. 

Yellowstone River – in YNP

Sight fishing for large, dry-fly-sipping Yellowstone Cutthroats has been great in the technical flat water of the Caldera. An assortment of bugs are active now. So, bring an inquisitive eye, and a fly box full of size #18-12 mayfly spinners in rusty and olive. PMD and Green Drake duns, as well as Salmonfly and Golden Stone adults will also be important. 
The rugged waters of both the Black and Grand Canyons of the Yellowstone continue to fish well for those adventurous anglers willing to hike. Salmonflies and Goldenstones are giving way to Nocturnal stoneflies and Hoppers. So, you will be week served to have a robust supply of large, foam dry flies with plenty of rubberlegs. “Waterwalkers” in size 8-10 fit the bill. 

Yellowstone Lake

It’s time look for Callibaetis spinner falls on any calm, warm mornings. The shallow weed flats near Bridge Bay, Gull Point, and Sand Point all provide opportunities for the wade fisherman to cast dry flies to cruising Cutts. 

Northeast Corner – Slough Cr, Lamar River

We’re seeing good water conditions and consistent fishing in the Cutthroat Corner. As always, keep an eye on the weather, be wary of any thunderstorms or rain events as they will bring color to the water (on Lamar), and check with the shop for up to date info before you make the trip.

Slough Creek

As we enter the peak of our summer season the backcountry meadows of Slough Creek are entering their prime. Water conditions are perfect, and mid summer hatches have Slough’s resident Cutts looking to the surface. Expect to see PMD’s, Gray Drake’s, Golden Stones, and Caddis. 
As always, you will want to be prepared with Bear Spray anytime you fish Slough, especially in the backcountry meadows. 
Biting flies are still around. So, make sure you have your favorite bug dope as well. If you don’t have a favorite, stop by the shop and pick up some of ours, Ultrathon. We have it in both the lotion and spray, and have found nothing better short of full strength deet to deter those sinister little bugs. Good enough for the US Armed Forces, good enough for us, this is the stuff that works.

Lamar River 

The Lamar River is fishing very well right now. Flows and water clarity are perfect. Expect to see a variety of bugs hatching from PMD’s and Green Drakes, to caddis and Golden Stones.
You should always come to the Lamar Valley expecting to cover a lot of water and territory while fishing. This is big country, and as the river naturally decreases in flow each summer the fish slowly move and concentrate in only the most prime pieces of water. You’ll see many spots that look like they might have a fish or two and have none. Other spots will be just too good to pass up, and here you will find every fish in that section. Spend your time fishing these A+ spots, and pass up everything else. Once you’ve found a few fish, move on to the next spot that you just can’t pass up. 

Gallatin River – in YNP

Warm weather brings out the best in the park waters of the Gallatin. This is a great afternoon or evening option after an am session on the Madison. Not much has changed here bug wise since last week. PMD’s, caddis, yellow sallies, Green Drakes, Flavs, and the last of the Golden Stones are all on the menu. 

Gallatin River – outside YNP

Great fishing continues on downstream through Big Sky and the canyon waters. Afternoon action is slower here than up in the Park waters, but morning and evening sessions will produce good numbers of fish rising to Size #14-16 rusty spinners and caddis. 

Hebgen Lake – by Steve Hoovler

Consistent, warm weather is a key ingredient to the early stages of gulper fishing on Hebgen Lake. Trico and Callibaetis mayflies are another critical component. All three are present now, and gulpering Is well underway. If Gulpers and Gulpering are foreign words and/or concepts to you, swing by the shop for some enlightenment, and possibly an introduction to your next addiction.

Madison River – by Joe Moore

The flows below Hebgen Dam bounced up this past week and we are now sitting at 985 cfs. Way downstream at Varney Bridge, the river is moving along at 1460 cfs. Overall, the Madison is fishing well throughout the day, but she can be a bit moody at times. There will be sections that are slower than others and parts of the day that fish better. Various lulls throughout the day are to be expected, so pay attention to the bite and keep fishing. The warmer day time air temps and bright sun have these fish a little gun shy, but there is still plenty of game out there to be had. 
Caddis are still hatching in decent numbers and Epeorus mayflies have made an appearance as well. Fishing caddis and a cinnamon colored parachute, Jojo’s PMD, the Parashuck PMD, Riffle Riser Crip, X Caddis, Tom’s Caddis, Comparabuzz, rusty parachute, Missing Link and the Chubbinator are the soup de jour. Ants and hoppers are starting to turn a few fish as well, so be prepared with those. Fishing subsurface with rubber leg stone flies, biot stones, Prince nymphs, tungsten PT’s, olive Arizona Hare’s Ear, Hare & Copper, Dips and of course a smattering of different perdigon nymph patterns will produce if you need to go there. Take a few moments to observe the river and watch the natural world unfold. It will show you the way if you let it.

Henry’s Fork of the Snake – by Jonathan Heames

Irrigation season remains in full force on the Henry’s Fork at this time, while other rivers in the area are experiencing rapidly decreasing flows and low water conditions, the Henry’s Fork is nearing spring flow levels out of Island Park Reservoir. This is one of the characteristics of the Fork that makes it such a unique and complementary fishery in Yellowstone country. On the Fork, we are back to nymphing rubberlegs and finding fish in shallows that three weeks ago were too low and fish had already moved out of.
The Box Canyon remains as consistent as ever, but flows are up to 1700 cfs out of Island Park Dam and that requires a shift in tactics that isn’t common this time of year in other fisheries. Trade in the 4X for 2X and 3X and put some BB split shot on a leader that might have an extra foot in length between the first fly and the indicator. Keep an eye on clarity in the canyon this time of year, if the water is off color, try flies with a touch of fluorescence. Rubberlegs nymphs and tungsten-headed nymphs will get you started off on the right foot.
The Railroad Ranch is running high and approaching a time of year where bugs become inconsistent at best. Plenty of water in the river means those bank lies will hold enough water to help trout feel comfortable again. This is good for the coming terrestrial season. Keep a sharp eye out for inconsistent and sparse rising activity and don’t be afraid to put a clean shot on a spot you thought you saw a rise in 10 minutes ago. Higher water levels encourage trout to remain in their lies and not go hunting and cruising for food like they have been the past month. Now is the time that the Ranch angler becomes more of a hunter than a shooter. Expect fewer rises overall but be prepared with food that will raise those inconsistently rising trout. Flying ants, beetles, grasshoppers, caddis, pmds, and flavs are all still a possiblility out there. Callibaetis on the horizon!
The canyons below remain consistent and offer great dry/dropper fishing at this moment, these summer periods are wonderful times to disappear fishing in one of the canyons. High walls with lots of trees provide shady spots to pull over on hot summer days, highly oxygenated water keeps the trout in these sections happy and busy.
The section just above Ashton Reservoir, from the confluence of Warm River represents the Henry’s Fork at its largest, this is the last section of the river before diversions begin to take water out for irrigation. The river is moving right along in here and be prepared to hunt the shallows for a few nice trout or fish the transitions with nymph rigs for good action. Rubberlegs, tungsten mayfly nymphs and caddis pupa are all essential for the quiver here. Don’t forget the size 14 brown and red zebra midges!
Though the odd large trout appear from time to time, now is the right time to give this section a rest unless you are fishing the morning hours or watching the weather and flows closely. This is not the fishery it was a month ago, and those tied mostly closely to it do well to keep a keen eye on conditions. Generally, temps are too high for these sections to be reliable throughout the day.

Missouri River – by Joe Moore and Jonathan Heames

The Missouri River is flowing at 4920 cfs and with any luck it will sit right here for a little while. Tricos have showed up, caddis are present and PMDs are on the decline. Caddis generally remain the fly to present first for dry fly fishing with tricos on the immediate horizon. Cloudy days will have both rusty and yellow spinners in the morning, sizes 14-20. It ain’t easy out there on the dry fly and that first cast is everything. After that first cast, one’s chances are reduced drastically. 
Don’t underestimate the value of a down-and-across presentation with a well-executed reach cast that lands 40 feet away with slack in the tippet. This kind of dry fly fishing is honest. Trout at this time of year demand a perfect presentation. If it’s not perfect…well, it’s not what works and it will put the trout down. 
For the dry fly angler, it’s gonna be a spinner and emerger game on the mayfly side of things and for the near future, caddis patterns like the Comparabuzz in grey and tan, Halo Caddis, Henry’s Fork CDC caddis in 16-18, Rusty Spinner, Trico Spinner and Tom’s Caddis will fool most any trout on the Missouri River. 
Nymph fishing has been productive, especially in the morning hours on a sunny day. If there are clouds around, you’ll notice a difference in the quality of the fishing. Even sparse cloud cover makes a difference. Give us a shout if you’re headed up that way as we have a fresh report almost daily from Greg, Ray and Mike. Split back PMDs, Green Machine, Tom’s nymph, Pyscho Princes, Silvey’s Pupa and weight flies are working with the emergence of PMDs and caddis. 
The crayfish game is definitely in play right now. The Zirdle or Zit under a bobber, either short or long with a bead head behind it will make you smile.

River Flows and Weather Forecast

Below are links to the flows in Montana and Idaho as well as. This time of the year flows and the weather are changing daily, if not by the hour. Click the links below for the most up to date information. 
Montana River Flows
Idaho River Flows
West Yellowstone Weather Forecast

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 7/16/2020

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 7/16/2020


Hello there from West Yellowstone – the Trout Capital of the World!

The past month as been a whirlwind of guiding and traveling from the Henry’s Fork, to the Madison, to the Missouri and back again to the Madison River. My guide schedule has slowed down a little bit and I’ll now be spending time in the shop helping Justin and Jonathan manage the flow and getting on the water a bit for myself. Yellowstone National Park is coming into prime time for the Yellowstone River and the tributaries and while Jonathan is away guiding the Missouri, Justin and I have planned to make a day of it on the Yellowstone River for Opening Day. It’s been close to 20 years since I have been able to fish the big river on July 15! By the time you read this, we will have hopefully fooled a few of those Cutthroat in Hayden Valley. 

The fly shop is OPEN from 7am to 9pm, seven days a week. Our guide staff is on the river daily; the Henry’s Fork in Idaho, the Madison in Montana and the Missouri River in Craig are all fishing quite well. The east side of YNP is shaping up as the West side begins to warm pushing our interest in the Firehole and Madison aside until late August. The fly shop is a clean and healthy environment for both our customers and staff members. There is a sanitation station at the door complete with hand sanitizer and masks if you choose to wear one; the staff will continue wearing masks for the unforeseen future. Our fishing report is written on the whiteboard right outside the door for your enjoyment, but as always, the freshest report is inside the doors of the fly shop. Stop on by, say hello and we’ll get you taken care of. 

Take care and read on, 
~ Joe 

Henry’s Fork of the Snake – by Jonathan Heames

While water levels are on the decrease in rivers around the west during the middle of summer, the Henry’s Fork begins to show some of its unique characteristics of water management. Flows begin to increase and some years these flows in June and early August can rival the high flows of the runoff season. This is the time of year that the water stored for irrigation is being called for and is being moved through the system. 
In the Box Canyon, just below Island Park Reservoir, flows are now close to 1500 cfs, having stepped up consistently each day over the past two weeks. Fishing will stay relatively constant and this remains a good time to fish the Box. These high flows seem to energize the trout in this boulder-strewn section of water and they remain actively feeding on mayfly nymphs, caddis pupa, as well as the odd stonefly nymph. Lengthen your nymphing leaders accordingly and you will find yourself adding a BB shot to reach the bottom in some of the faster runs. 
In the Railroad Ranch, the high water will taper some of the action off. There will still be trout sipping on the surface but the hatches become less consistent. It’s still worth searching for morning spinner falls and keeping your eyes open for bank feeders. This is a time of year that we can begin to see the first flying ant falls, other terrestrial patterns now taking a hold on the fishery as well.
The canyon country below the Ranch remains consistent, flows are higher but, as in the case of the Box Canyon, the trout are livened up by the increase in flows and good fishing will be found all the way to Ashton Reservoir. The scenic section just above Ashton provides some of the most consistent fishing found anywhere in the area and is one of the best sections of water we know of to introduce someone to the sport, youngster or adult.
The increase in flows through the system is intended for the land and area surrounding Ashton, so the draws begin to diminish the river’s size below Ashton Reservoir. Fishing below the reservoir has small windows of opportunity but is generally best left alone for the next 6 weeks due to higher water temps and low water levels.

Madison River – by Joe Moore

The flows below Hebgen Dam have flatlined for the past week and we are sitting at 813 cfs. While this is a decent flow it would normally be about 200 cfs higher, but we’ll take it! Way downstream at Varney Bridge, the river is moving right along at 1590 cfs. We have found the fish to be sitting off the bank, at times 6-10 feet off the bank until there are caddis around. Once those caddis begin hatching mid morning or laying eggs late in the evening you will find fish on the banks in shallow water. Overall, the Madison is fishing really well throughout the day. There will be sections that are slower than others and parts of the day that fish better. The cooler overnight temperatures are keeping everyone and everything happy as a clam at high tide. 
PMDs and Caddis are hatching in solid numbers; green drakes and Flavs are still showing up in a few places. Goldens and Salmonflies are still around in specific spots, we won’t go into details on the Big Bugs, but stop by the shop if you want to know more. Jojo’s PMD, the Parashuck PMD, Riffle Riser Crip, X Caddis, Tom’s Caddis, Comparabuzz, Missing Link, Lawson’s Golden, Lawson’s Salmonfly and the Chubbinator are the soup de jour. Fishing subsurface with rubber leg stone flies, biot stones, Prince nymphs, tungsten PT’s, olive Arizona Hare’s Ear, Hare & Copper, Dips and of course a smattering of different perdigon nymph patterns will produce if you need to go there. We suggest that you knot on a dry fly, cover some water and leave the nymphs in the truck. Take a few moments to observe the river and watch the natural world unfold. It will show you the way if you let it. 

Missouri River – by Joe Moore

The Missouri River is humming right along at 5950 cfs. Last week Joe experienced a large drop in flows, the river fell darn near 6,000 cfs in a matter of several days. Fishing was still solid, but changing tactics during the plummet was key. Jonathan is up there this week and as luck would have, the flows haven’t changed too much. They have been feeding fish dry flies and having great success. Give us a shout if you’re headed up that way as we have a fresh report almost daily from Jonathan and Greg. Split back PMDs, Green Machine, Tom’s nymph, Pyscho Princes, Silvey’s Pupa and weight flies are working with the emergence of PMDs and caddis. For the dry fly angler, it’s gonna be a spinner and emerger game on the mayfly side of things and as always, caddis patterns like the Comparabuzz, Halo Caddis and Tom’s Caddis will fool most any trout on the Missouri River.

Yellowstone National Park – by Steve Hoovler

We’ve been waiting patiently, but the time has finally come to fully commit our attention to Yellowstone Park waters. Flows, temps, and hatches are all at or near prime right now, and the next several weeks will be the height of the season.

Yellowstone River – in YNP
The upper caldera stretch of the Yellowstone River from Chittenden Bridge upstream to Yellowstone Lake opened on July 15. This is among the best sight fishing venues in the sport, and it’s just coming into its prime. Flows are still a bit generous. So, don’t expect to cross anytime soon without a heroic effort. Luckily, you should be able to find some good targets from the bank with a little hunting. Expect to see Salmonflies, Golden Stones, PMD’s and Caddis with Gray and Green Drakes imminent. 
The Canyon stretches of the Yellowstone River are still a great place to take an adventurous hike to fish Salmonflies and Golden Stones. Bring your bear spray, plenty of water, and some good hiking boots/shoes. There’s not much need for wading here as flows are still aggressive, and all of your opportunities will be right along the banks.

Northeast Corner – Slough Cr, Lamar River, Soda Butte Cr

We’re finally seeing good water conditions and consistent fishing in the Cutthroat Corner. As always, keep an eye on the weather, be wary of any thunderstorms or rain events as they will bring color to the water (on Lamar and Soda Butte), and check with the shop for up to date info before you make the trip.

Slough Creek
Still a strong amount of water in Slough Creek, but it’s slowly coming down. Hatches of PMD’s, Caddis, and a few Gray Drakes are bringing Cutts to the surface. Biting flies are active here too. So, don’t forget your bug spray, long sleeves, and pants. 

Lamar River 
Both water levels and clarity have improved on the Lamar. Flows are low enough to wade throughout the valley. Stoneflies are still active in the canyon stretches. Caddis, PMD’s and Green Drakes are the main attraction out in the valley. 

Soda Butte Creek Good water conditions, PMD hatches, and rising Cutthroat Trout have made Soda Butte a favorite among visiting anglers for years, and this season is no exception.

Gardner River
This small, pocket water tributary to the Yellowstone River remains a good bet for some dry fly fishing with caddis, PMD’s, Golden Stones, and a few Salmonflies. 

Gallatin River – in YNP
Mornings are still cold (30’s), but warm weather has spurred some great fishing in the afternoons and evenings on the Park stretch of the Gallatin River. PMD’s, Caddis, Golden Stones, and Green Drakes are all active right now, and some good fish are looking for them. These waters are diverse in bug life and fish species alike with opportunities to catch browns, rainbows, Cutts, Cutts-bows, brookies, and whitefish. 

Gallatin River – outside YNP
The Gallatin near Big Sky, and through the canyon is also fishing well right now. Water conditions are great, and fish have plenty of bugs to keep them actively feeding throughout the day. These lower waters are considerably warmer than the Park waters, and feeding activity will begin far earlier in the day. Look caddis, PMD’s, Goldenstones, Flavs, and Green Drakes. 

Hebgen Lake 
Consistent, warm weather is a key ingredient to the early stages of gulper fishing on Hebgen Lake. Trico and Callibaetis mayflies are another critical component. All three are present now, and gulpering should soon be underway. If Gulpers and Gulpering are foreign words and/or concepts to you, swing by the shop for some enlightenment, and possibly an introduction to your next addiction.

River Flows and Weather Forecast

Below are links to the flows in Montana and Idaho as well as. This time of the year flows and the weather are changing daily, if not by the hour. Click the links below for the most up to date information. 
Montana River Flows
Idaho River Flows
West Yellowstone Weather Forecast

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 7/9/2020

Big Sky Anglers Weekly Fishing Report 7/9/2020


Hello there from West Yellowstone – the Trout Capital of the World!

I left today, Monday morning, for the Missouri River. I’ll be up north guiding with Greg Falls for next several days. On my way through the Madison Valley my truck and drift boat somehow found their way parked along along highway 287 with me staring at the river. For the past nine days I’ve been rowing the Madison with all of my long time clients who have become dear friends along the way. We share stories from the past year and discuss the finer points of dry fly fishing. We discuss reach casts, up stream presentations, managing slack line, various hook sets and why trout eat dry flies the way they do. I don’t have all the answers to the trickyness on the river, but I do get to watch fish rise for a living. My initial plan was to arrive in Craig early enough to make a drive along the entire river and maybe drink a beer in the Trout Shop parking lot with the locals. That plan was quickly foiled once I observed a few fish rising along the highway. My new plan was to make thirty or forty casts, catch a few trout and then make my way north. At 3pm I jumped out of the truck, rigged a Winston and snagged an unorganized fly cup of used flies from this past week. Floatant, hemos, nippers and tippet rounded out my tools for this session. Caddis were now tumbling down the river and several fish showed themselves. I landed more trout than I should have but it felt so damn nice wet wading knee deep in the Madison River that I just had to keep fishing. When I finally looked down at the clock, it was 5pm! Two hours had flown right by and I could have kept fishing until dark. Twenty years ago, I would have done just that, no doubt. Between the Madison, Henry’s Fork, YNP and the Missouri River, there might not be a better place in the world to learn how to present a dry fly. We are more than fortunate to live here, thats for sure.

The fly shop is OPEN from 7am to 9pm, seven days a week. Our guide staff is on the river daily; the Henry’s Fork in Idaho, the Madison in Montana and the Missouri River in Craig are all fishing quite well. The east side of YNP is shaping up as the West side begins to warm pushing our interest in the Firehole and Madison aside until late August. The fly shop is a clean and healthy environment for both our customers and staff members. There is a sanitation station at the door complete with hand sanitizer and masks if you choose to wear one; the staff will continue wearing masks for the unforeseen future. Our fishing report is written on the whiteboard right outside the door for your enjoyment, but as always, the freshest report is inside the doors of the fly shop. Stop on by, say hello and we’ll get you taken care of. 

Take care and read on, 
~ Joe

Henry’s Fork of the Snake – by Jonathan Heames

Tetons on the eastern horizon. Mid-summer is for the high country, and the upper Henry’s Fork basin in the Island Park caldera is a great place to spend these beautiful mid-July days.
This is the timeframe that reminds us just how important PMD hatches are to the daily routine of our trout. These bugs drive the daily bite in places like the Box Canyon and the Railroad Ranch, these are the insects responsible for the routine feeding behavior that creates angler opportunity virtually every day. No doubt, there are still flavs, caddis, golden stoneflies, and even a few drakes still around, and they can all come into play on any day, but I like to approach the water each day with an idea in mind, and for the next couple of weeks, keeping these little mayflies on your mind when selecting flies is a good move.
The Box Canyon continues to fish well, is running clear, and has been hovering in the high 800’s in cfs. This is enough water to allow trout to spread out and low enough that most all of the river’s features are reachable with flies. Daily hatches of pmds and caddis will drive the bite here, and golden stone adults presently inhabit the canyon. They will descend on the water at times throughout the month, sometimes en masse and create terrific and rather unpredictable dry fly opportunities, so be sure to have a couple good imitations along on any float down the Canyon. Successful nymph patterns will include rubberlegs, pheasant tails, perdigon nymphs, zebra midges (don’t be without a red one). 
The Railroad Ranch. An ideal day on the Ranch is often found in July, a bluebird, calm morning with a spinner fall that gets the trout steadily rising followed by an emergence of pmds will fill up a morning until lunchtime nicely. As the clock turns past lunch, it’s always nice to have the gathering of some white and billowing clouds sprinkled in against the blue sky. This will not only keep us anglers more comfortable but it also serves to get the pmds to keep it up, and encourages flavs to begin to emerge in the later afternoon rather than waiting until the last hour of daylight. More hours of hatching = more hours of fishing! Evenings will have good spinner falls and flav emergences with some great caddis fishing mixed in there. Caddis can be found during the days as well. It pays to have a well-stocked selection of size 14-16 rusty CDC or para-spinners, pmd emergers and cripples, as well as adults, flav sparkle duns, thorax ties, and last chance cripples. A handful of henry’s fork CDC caddis in both olive and tan, or a corn-fed caddis in the box is a smart move as well. It’s also a good time to make sure you have a flying ant or two just in case you luck into an early ant flight.
The canyon country below the Ranch will continue to offer consistent dry/dropper fishing with golden stones and rubberlegs or pheasant tails hung below, and the float section from Warm River to Ashton remains an excellent option for novice anglers and those looking for good action. Nymphing and dry fly fishing will produce here with pmd and caddis imitations.
Below Ashton Reservoir. Water temps on the rise as irrigation demand decreases the volume of water in the channel here. The heat of the summer is a good time to leave these fish alone. Early mornings hold some opportunity but most of the day’s fishing efforts should be focused in the waters upstream of Ashton.

Madison River – by Joe Moore

The flows at Hebgen Dam bumped to 813 CFS, a nice change for sure and with any luck we’ll get another 100+ cfs here soon. Hebgen is darn near full, maybe 6 inches from the top of the glass so we should see stable flows for the next month and change. The sexy bank water has filled in and the tributaries are kicking in their share to help keep flows higher as one moves downstream in the Madison Valley. Overall, the Madison is fishing really well. We are more than excited to see the plump rainbows and browns recklessly rising to Caddis; it’s a throwback to the old days, the old days being the late 90’s when most of us around here started guiding the Madison River. PMDs and Caddis are hatching in solid numbers; green drakes and Flavs are showing up in a few places. Goldens and Salmonflies are river wide, but mainly found in the upper end of the Madison Valley. Jojo’s PMD, the Parashuck PMD, Riffle Riser Crip, X Caddis, Tom’s Caddis, Comparabuzz, Missing Link, Lawson’s Golden, Lawson’s Salmonfly and the Chubbinator are the soup de jour. Fishing subsurface with rubber leg stone flies, biot stones, Prince nymphs, tungsten PT’s, olive Arizona Hare’s Ear, Hare & Copper, Dips and of course a smattering of different perdigon nymph patterns will produce if you need to go there. We suggest that you knot on a dry fly, cover some water and leave the nymphs in the truck. Take a few moments to observe the river and watch the natural world unfold. It will show you the way if you let it.

Missouri River – by Joe Moore

The Missouri River is dropping like a rock; flows have gone from 11,800 cfs on the 4th of July to 9300 cfs three days later. We expect the river to drop a little more and possibly hit the 6500 mark by the end of the end of the week. This is fantastic news for all anglers as the deep nymping is starting to wear folks down. The dry fly fishing should turn on and give way to Tricos soon enough. Give us a shout if you’re headed up that way as we have a fresh report almost daily. Joe is on the river this week and will be dropping in on our social media platforms with updates. Jonathan will be up there on his heels in the second week of July. Split back PMDs, Green Machine, Tom’s nymph, Pyscho Princes, Silvey’s Pupa and weight flies are working with the emergence of PMDs and caddis. For the dry fly angler, it’s gonna be a spinner and emerger game on the mayfly side of things and as always, caddis patterns like the Comparabuzz, Halo Caddis and Tom’s Caddis will fool most any trout on the Missouri River.

Yellowstone National Park – by Steve Hoovler

Hmmmmm…it keeps raining. We’re all dying to head into the park to scratch that cutthroat itch…but, it keeps raining. Will this be the week things finally shape up and dry out…Yes…Maybe…Not sure. We’ll just have to wait and see. In the meantime there is still some fun fishing in Yellowstone right now, and it will only get better as we cruise through July.


Northeast Corner – Slough Cr, Lamar River, Soda Butte Cr
Slough Creek
Of the three Cutthroat fisheries in the Northeast Corner that have us waiting on the edge of our seats, Slough Creek is the closest to having good water conditions and consistent fishing. Water levels remain a bit high and cold, but good bug activity has started here, and fish are responding in kind. Look for PMD’s, Gray Drakes, Salmonflies, and Goldenstones in the lower meadow stretch below the campground. You will want to be well heeled with both bug spray and bear spray for any venture into Slough Creek, even the lower, roadside sections right now. 

Lamar River and Soda Butte Creek
The remaining two Northeast Corner favorites continue to suffer from less than ideal water conditions as the result of recent rains and the tail end of spring runoff. We’re very close on both of these waters. If the forecasts hold out (I know we’ve been saying this for weeks) they could kick into gear this week. Once they do spring into action, expect to see some of the first emergences of PMD mayflies and tan caddis. 

Yellowstone River – in YNP
July 15 is the opener for the fabled stretch from Chittenden Bridge upstream to Yellowstone Lake (and above Yellowstone Lake). We’re excited to check out this fishery and see how the Cutthroat population is doing this season. There’s been a steady increase in fish numbers over the past few seasons, and we’re hopeful to see more recruitment to the population again this year. 
The river is still running high and cold, but water clarity is good around legendary dry fly spots like Sulphur Caldron, Nez Perce Ford, and Cascade Creek. It will be a while before we can safely cross the river. If you venture out for the opener, be sure to treat the big river with respect and wade cautiously. 
The Yellowstone River’s canyon stretches have seen their fair share of salmonflies, and muddy water (if you’re below the Lamar River confluence). Flows are still high enough to make for some adventure wading. Though, plenty of fish can be found tight to the bank right now. Keep in mind, the river access below Tower Falls remains closed. 

Gardner River
This small, pocket water tributary to the Yellowstone River remains a good bet for some dry fly fishing with caddis, PMD’s, Golden Stones, and a few Salmonflies. 


Gallatin River – in YNP
It’s time to add the Gallatin to your dance cards this week. Water temps are warming up, and the first hatches of PMD’s, Caddis, Green Drakes are bringing fish to the surface. Look for Golden Stones, and Salmonflies in the Park stretch as temps warm too. 

Gallatin River – outside YNP
This week’s stormy weather brought color back to the Gallatin River below the Taylor’s Fork. Clarity should be back to normal by the weekend, and fishing will be good with a combination of caddis, PMD’s, and the return of big stoneflies driving the fishing. 

Hebgen Lake – by Matt Klara

I had a chance to get on the lake a couple of times last week, and things are really shaping up for the stillwater angler who likes to play around with multiple approaches. While many stillwaters get very dialed in, creating scenarios where there may clearly become one primary approach to fishing, Hebgen offers us a diverse array of situations and food sources, particularly at this time of year. Fishing a day from dawn to dusk on Hebgen these days could be compared to fishing several different stillwaters in fact. If you look in the right place at the right time, you can find just about anything. At first light, if you dare to wake up that early, you’d be clever to work the shallow margins and flats with a bugger or baitfish imitation, stripped at a nice pace. Don’t fool with 4x or even 3x, as the grabs can be savage. As the sun gets higher, fish’s attention will shift to smaller, buggier offerings, and you will need to down size and slow down. Chironomid and Callibaetis nymph fishing continues to be consistent at all levels of the water column. Look shallow on calm mornings in the arms for fish cruising and gulping chironomids and callibaetis. This is challenging dry fly and emerger fishing that rivals any in the US. When the breeze ruffled the surface or the rises disappeared, we dropped subsurface and found fish feeding on the usual mid depth flats and drops, on both callibaetis and chironomids (with a focus on smaller chironomids in #14 and 16). Mid-day doldrums can definitely be a thing this time of year, especially on super bright days. Take a siesta or go low and slow off the dropoffs, perhaps with a damsel nymph (as they are beginning to become more active) or a generic bug like Denny’s Stillwater Nymph for searching. Late in the day, fish will move back shallow as the light fades. Look for callibaetis, chironomids, and even caddis to bring fish to the top (or near the top) and work to moving fish, or cover the likely flats at a bit more depth! Stay til dark, and then limp yourself back to town or camp for a classic 11pm dinner time. Oh, the fishing life!

River Flows and Weather Forecast

Below are links to the flows in Montana and Idaho as well as. This time of the year flows and the weather are changing daily, if not by the hour. Click the links below for the most up to date information. 
Montana River Flows
Idaho River Flows
West Yellowstone Weather Forecast