The Madison has been fishing quite well this winter.  Some days have been better than others, but hey, that’s fishing.  Yesterday, I fished the West Fork area, Lyons Bridge and Reynolds Pass.  I had to work a little bit, but caught plenty of fish on nymphs like the 3$ dip, prince nymph, rubber legs and the red worm.  While I looked for heads, I didn’t see much at all.  Midges were coming off in decent numbers, but the north wind and sunny conditions may have kept the fish down – at least where I was fishing.  I did find a few nice brown trout in the shallow water sunning themselves, but I couldn’t get them to take a dry fly. With the lack of snow pack on the level in the Madison valley, getting around the river bottom is pretty easy.  River left has more snow than river right, but once you get below the West Fork, both sides of the river are relatively free of snow.  Today was nasty.  I left Horse Butte with sunshine, broken clouds and hardly a breeze.  Turning left at the Duck Creek Y the north wind had picked up and temp was dropping slightly.  Rounding Quake Lake the wind was cranking up and I could see the wall of weather down in the Madison Valley.  At Reynolds Pass it began.  Blowing and drifting snow coupled with gusts that hit 30+ mph, made me sit in my rig and watch.  Annoyed by this at first, I quickly felt a relief set in as this moisture was exactly what the river was in need of.   Across the parking area I observed four 20 somethings rigging up bobbers and nymphs in this insane weather.  I fondly remember being this way too but took comfort in knowing that it’s okay to sit and watch one’s surroundings and enjoy just that.  It’s why I live thirty minutes from the Madison.


River Flows

Coming into Hebgen Lake: about 800 cfs

Below Hebgen – 841 cfs…down quite a bit.

At Kirby Ranch – 882 cfs…down as well.

Below Holter Dam on the Missouri River – 4900 cfs

Hebgen Lake is 5 feet from full, full pond is the elevation 6534.5 feet.

Snow Pack

Jefferson Drainage – 101%

Madison Drainage – 83%

Gallatin Drainage – 107%

Missouri Mainstem – 107%

A word or two on what all this means for us….

The flows have dropped quite a bit in the past few days and anglers should expect this flow or less for the rest of the winter season on the Madison River.   Flows were dropped down as the snow pack for the Hebgen Basin is not up to snuff.  While the snow is not deep, there is a ton of moisture in what we have on the ground.   This is not the time to fret, rather it’s time to go fishing and let Mother Nature take care of the weather – remember we have no control over the weather.  What we do have control over is the lake level at Hebgen Lake. Not that “we” control this, that’s left up to the folks at NW Energy.   I’ve been watching this like a hawk and talking with NW Energy’s biologist every few weeks.  He too is watching this closely, thus the reason for the drop in flows a couple days ago.  As of right now, the lake is almost a foot higher than a year ago today.  The in flows to Hebgen Lake are 800 cfs and at some point, NW Energy may drop the flows down to match out flows with in flows.  Hebgen Lake is normally (we all know how this can turn out) full by the end of June, so while the snow pack on the Madison, Gibbon and Firehole Rivers is low, there is a significant amount to time ahead of us for more moisture to fall.  Generally speaking, the months of March, April, May and June are when we get the moisture.  Now if you’re a downhill skier, then you probably aren’t too happy with this season, but my point is that there is plenty of time to fill Hebgen Lake.  Both the Gallatin and Jefferson drainages are holding slightly above normal snow pack and I’ll take 100% at this point in the winter any year.  The Missouri low lands are still holding quite a bit snow as well, which is always good news.