Are you a streamer junkie? Is the Tug your drug? Do you spend all year dreaming about gray autumn days and vicious takes from belligerent brown trout?

If the answer is yes, then you are undoubtedly familiar with the “Bump”.

We’ve all been there. You made a great cast. Your fly sets up at the right depth. The current takes hold of your line, and you feel the pressure build all the way into the cork of your rod. You begin to retrieve your line with deft strips, bringing life into your fly, and there it is. That moment when you connect with all your hopes and dreams at the end of the line.

But, what follows isn’t what you had hoped and dreamed for. It’s not a storied battle with a gnarled-faced brown trout. A heroic net job. A steely-eyed grip and grin shot that.

Nope. All you got was a Bump. And then there was nothing.

Many anglers count the Bump as a loss. But, it doesn’t have to be.

If all you get are Bumps some days, and you want to convert more of those Bumps into hopes and dreams, here are 3 Tips to Up Your Streamer Game.

Keep that Tip near the Water

Streamer fishing is unique among fly techniques because we impart life into our flies, enticing the take of a predatory trout through a tight line.

Sure, you can “Dead Drift” a streamer like a nymph or a dry fly. But, most of the time we are making them swim by swinging or stripping.

Whether you fish streamers on a static swing, or with a stripped retrieve, the position of your rod tip is very important to maintaining contact with your fly. A rod tip that is held too high while stripping or swinging will result in a length of slack line extending from your rod to the water. This slack line is a killer of hopes and dreams, and can be the difference between a Bump and a hooked fish.

By keeping the rod tip pointed at or near the water it’s easier to stay in touch with your fly and eliminate excess slack in your line. Every time you strip your line that movement will translate directly to your fly, and when you do elicit a strike you will be more likely to convert it into a hooked fish.

Slow it Down

Streamer fishing is one of the most active games that we can play with a fly rod. With all of that casting and stripping there’s a lot going on.

Many times the stakes are high as our targets are often the biggest fish we will chase all year.

It’s easy to get a little carried away. All it takes is one ferocious grab, and you’ll be stripping that fly like it owes you money.

We all want the savage eat from a furious brown trout that nearly rips the rod from your hands. But, let’s face it. That’s a low probability situation, even on the best of days.

Far more fish will eat a fly that is presented slowly and enticingly than one which is ripped past the trout’s face.

A slower retrieve will also maintain better contact with your fly making you more likely to convert those takes into hookups and not Bumps.

Don’t Trout Set

In fact, the best set is no set at all.

Not every streamer eat from a trout is an aggressive take where the fish turns on the fly making it easy to hook them in the corner of the mouth.

Frequently, a trout will see your fly and follow it as it moves through your retrieve. When the fish eats, it will often overtake your fly moving in the same direction of travel. Then, you strip, and take the fly right back from the fish.

Bump

 If the next thing you do is trout set, then you completely remove your fly from the game, and the fish is left wondering what happened to it’s meal.

If you do nothing, and continue to swing or strip. Then, your fly is still in the game, and you have an opportunity to convert that Bump into a hook up.

The Argentines call their streamers “Gatos” for cats, because of the similarity to teasing a cat with a cat toy.

When you feel a Bump try to keep your cool, and tease that fish into another Bump. Sometimes it takes two or three (or more) Bumps before the fish is keyed up enough to turn on the fly and catch the hook.

Conclusion

Bumps aren’t all bad.

It means that you put the fly in the right place, and made it look good enough for a trout to eat it.

Some times, no matter how hard you try to tease them, trout just won’t fully commit to your streamer.

But, if you keep these 3 tips in mind, you’ll be better prepared to convert those Bumps in hook ups.

Now grab your Gatos, get out there, and find some trout to tease.