Big Bugs

I won’t see a day this good on dry flies for a while….it ranks right up there as one the best days ever on the Madison when the big bugs are out.   Yesterday and the day before showed moments of greatness, but the river gave us a show today.  We got on later than yesterday as the morning temps were super chilly once again,  30 degrees when I stepped out of the house.   That’s pretty darn cold for July 1st.   Water temps the past couple days in the morning have been very cold as well, temping out at 46 degrees as I launched the boat off the trailer.  This morning was a little warmer, but with no clouds to speak of and the sun shinning down, the river warmed up quickly and fish begin to look up for the big fly.   There was a light north wind all day that kept the bugs flying and moving upstream.  Egg layers were out and sitting over the river…….Big Bugs were on the water.

Angling like this is not an everyday affair here on the Madison River, but every once in a while, shit falls into place just right and we have a banner day with large trout eating dry flies in all the fishy water.  The Madison rewards skill and on days like this, the better one is as an angler, the better the fishing can be.  Tomo could stick the fly inches from the bank and drift it for twenty feet.  He could drift the fly in the middle of the river for what seemed like eternity.  When the fish ate, he let it, then set hard, stripped line like a pro and calmly played the fish rarely losing his cool.  He believed in what he was doing and with three days on the water, he got in the groove – when the fish cooperated, Tomo didn’t miss a beat.  I absolutely love watching someone fish with skill.

Madison River Report 06.13.2014

At some point in the last seven days, the Madison went from greenish brown and high to damn near clear and lower than expected for June 13th.   Some of this is due to no rain and cooler nights and some of this is due to PPL missing the mark and dropping the flows in order to fill Hebgen.  Sound familar?  Yea…..sadly, we thought so too.  We are sitting at the top of the water chain, so to speak, Hebgen should be much easier to manage.  After all, they are supposed to be managing water.  Dropping the flows during run off, to fill the lake, means that someone wasn’t paying attention to the weather and the snowpack over the past month ro so.  However, PPL did some very positive things this past winter:  they ran the flows lower all winter therefore keeping the lake elevation higher to start the spring.  They also are getting closer to actually finishing the repairs on the dam. Hopefully, in a year’s time, we will have a fully functioning dam once again….seven and half years from the time construction started.

Can you imagine if they would’ve run the lake down all the way down to their normal winter mark?  Let’s not think about that….

Instead lets think about summer, trout fishing and the World Cup.  Folks, it’s here.  After a long winter the river is awake and is on the fringe of popping.  Nymph fishing and the streamer bite has been good to great and fish are just beginning to look up towards the surface.  Yesterday we floated the Madison for a little R & D to show BRF shop rat and Qtown native, Luke Mayfield, what’s in store for his first summer living in West Yellowstone.  Luke’s been here for a month, but hadn’t fished or driven below $3 Bridge on the Madison.  When we drove down and around Pine Butte, he was like, “wow, check out those gravel bars and islands.”

Ya man, there is a ton of fishy water on this river……

Today was the start of the greatest soccer tournament in the world and I couldn’t be more excited!  For the next month, it will be hard to leave the house and go fishing, that’s for sure.  The rules are simple, if you end up in the boat with me, ask me if I’ve see the outcome of a game before you tell me the outcome of a game. I realize that not everyone cares about this game, but I do and I love watching about as much as I love fishing.  My playing days are long gone, but just the other night we got into a fine game of Asses Up…..it was too fun.

Stay tuned, the summer is just beginning.

pondering water

River Flows

Missouri River at Holter: 6090 cfs at 6pm…….three days ago it was 11,200 cfs.

Madison River below Hebgen: 1200 cfs…….five days ago it was 1850 cfs.

Madison River at Kirby: 1880 cfs…….fishing’s not too bad at all with nymphs in the wade stretch.

Madison River at Varney: 2980 cfs…….muddy, but you can catch a few if you try hard enough.

A week ago, most of us on the Missouri and Madison were preparing for a high water year.  Then, things started to drop and flow managers, it seems, began to panic about filling the lakes and the flows were pared back to say the least.   Some folks are saying that runoff has peaked……this being said, it’s only June 4th and there’s still boat loads of snow in the high country.   I believe that round two of runoff is not far behind.  More warm weather is in the forecast and I plan on taking a hike up into the high country next week to check a few spots and look at snow pack.  With any luck, Hebgen will fill by the end of the month and we wont’ have a situation like last season with low flows and dried up spawning beds.  Canyon Ferry is filling as this is being written, but there is concern that it too won’t fill to full capacity.

This water management concept seems to be hard to figure out……..snow falls and then it melts, at some point a lake or two needs to be filled.  While there are lots of variables in the equation and after this many years of managing water, one would think that the water managers would have a easier time with filling the lakes.

If Hebgen isn’t filled by the end of month, it will be disappointing to say the least – this was a banner year for snow pack and filling the lakes should’ve have been an easy task.   There is a flow meeting in West Yellowstone on June 12th held by PPL, should be an interesting time.

The Missouri has been, for the most part, pretty good fishing for the past month.   From 1-3 fishing’s been a little weird.   Some days the fish are grabby in some spots and other days they have moved out of the runs.   We’re not getting em’ everywhere and are having to work a little bit.  We’ve been mostly nymphing with sow bugs, worms, caddis pupa and bwo nymphs.   As the river began to drop a few days ago, the dry fly fishing reared it’s head.  A fish here and there were up eating spinners and we found a couple smallish pods that were easily put down after a fish was hooked and blew up jumping it’s way off the hook.

While there is NOT full blown dry fly fishing on the Missouri, we are getting closer each day.   If these Missouri flows stabilize and stop jumping around, the caddis should begin and we can stop staring at the bobber all day long.  PMD’s? They’ll come soon enough….and when they do the river will come alive.

At this point, my guess is that we’ll be fishing salmonflies on the Madison by the end June……..don’t hold me to this as my crystal ball broke about 38 years ago.

Late May in Montana

Snow is melting at rapid pace up high in the mountains all across Montana, Wyoming and Idaho.  One glance at the flows online will show rivers on the rise, some of which are almost double for this time of the year.  The white stuff is still pretty deep in the high country, but the last week t o ten days worth of warm weather mixed with some rain has brought a big push water.   Wet wading has been standard protocol, but we aren’t wading much on the Missouri, just getting our feet wet from time to time.  Anglers should expect this to be the case for a while now, but it’s hard to say just how long run off will go this season.  It all depends on the weather. More sun and rain will push it out, cooler temps and no rain will slow it down.  Pay attention to the weather and you too can guess when the Salmon flies will hatch on the Madison.  I’m still not throwing a date out for this…….too hard to figure this early into run off.

I’ve been living on the Missouri for the past month, but have managed a handful of days back in West Yellowstone.  TAKF was held on May 20th and I got a couple days of fishing in around West Yellowstone and Idaho as well.   It’s been a very busy May for us and June is right around the corner.   The next few weeks will find us hanging out on the Missouri guiding anglers with a another visit home and then back to the Missouri for mid and late June.  With any luck, we’ll be fishing the Madison River a month from now.

Madison River Fishing Report 04.20.2014

Driving down to the Madison Valley, yesterday afternoon, was a great decision.  I almost didn’t go, cause construction, moving to our new place and the guide season starting in late April has consumed me; I wasn’t sure if I could even enjoy fishing with all that lies head.   However, as one who has blown off many a’ job to go fishing, this was a much needed day on the water and I am better for it.

Driving past Hebgen Dam and towards Cabin Creek, I counted 11…yes….11 rigs and twice as many anglers.  I was told that 14 rigs where there on Saturday.  While this stretch is completely legal to fish, it was borderline gross to see all the anglers packed into such a small stretch of river.  I too have fished this stretch, countless hours during the Springtime over the past sixteen years, but I just can’t bring myself to fish so darn close to other anglers and stomp redds in the process when there are miles and miles of water below McAtee to access.  Biologists will tell you that stepping on redds really doesn’t hurt the fishery, but somehow I’m not sure that I agree, especially when FWP closes the river from Quake’s outlet to McAtee Bridge in order to “protect spawning habitat”.  I’m starting to think, as are other anglers, that closing Betwix the Lakes in March, April and early May is a good idea.  Maybe Palisades down to McAtee could be opened up to give anglers more water to fish.

Note:  Please remember that Quake to Mac is closed……I saw anglers at Pine Butte yesterday.  This happens every single season and if they didn’t read the regulations, how would they know that the river is closed?  There are no signs ANYWHERE telling anglers otherwise.

Midges were thick when I showed up to the river and shortly after, BWOs started hatching in decent numbers.  There were a few fish looking up, but I did best underneath with a rubber legs and small PT.   It was a gorgeous day in the Madison Valley and while the fishing was solid, I could’ve cared less cause it was just nice to be on the water.

Upper Madison River Fishing Report 02.22.2014

After a quick run to the dump and to town for some gas, the dogs and I ran down to the Madison Valley.  It was 14 degrees when we departed and slightly blowing.  Rounding Hebgen I was looking forward to spending a couple of hours on the river as it has been over a month since I stepped foot down in the valley.  Upon hitting Quake Lake the wind picked up and was blowing hard…..the kind of wind that makes you want to turn around, head for the couch and watch some English Premier League.   Luckily, I kept driving and once in the Madison Valley, the wind vanished and the temps warmed up a bit to the mid-twenties.  Midges were already rolling down the river at noon and a thin veil of clouds was keeping the sun at bay.  For a Saturday, I was surprised to only see two other anglers.  After fishing the bridge pool, I looked up to see my buddy Neil atop of Reynolds Pass Bridge.  We caught up for a few minutes and decided to walk downstream and work back up.  Over four hours later Neil and I had made our way back to the bridge and went trout for trout the entire time.  Both of us never changed flies, fishing a single midge pattern all afternoon.

Today was one of those days………