2018 Demo Gear Clearance Sale

2018 Demo Gear Clearance Sale

Hi everyone.  Our season is winding down here in the mountains.  Guide trips are dwindling to late fall levels, our Spey Days Event has come and gone, and our final Euro Nymph clinic of 2018 is in the books.  Our 2018 demo gear has trickled back into the shop and we have it up on the website now.  Check out the final list of demo gear we have for sale, and act fast because we expect this stuff to move quickly.  See below for a list of Demo Gear currently on sale.  All gear has seen light and limited use and is being cleared out to make room for new demo gear next season.

All inquiries must be made via email to Justin Spence – jspence@bigskyanglers.com

Thanks.

Demo Rods

  • Sage ESN 3106-4 10’6” 3wt Euro Nymph rod, MSRP $900 / SALE PRICE $540
  • Sage X 590-4 9’ 5 wt., MSRP $899 / SALE PRICE $539
  • Sage X 690-4 9’ 6 wt., MSRP $899 / SALE PRICE $539
  • Sage X 697-4 9’6” 6wt with Fighting Butt, MSRP $899 / SALE PRICE $539
  • Sage X 5101-4 10’ 5wt with Fighting Butt, MSRP $899 / SALE PRICE $539
  • Sage X 7100-4 10’ 7wt with Fighting Butt, MSRP $899 / SALE PRICE $539
  • Sage X 6110-4 11’ 6 wt.,  MSRP $1,099/ SALE PRICE $660
  • Winston AIR 9’ 5wt, MSRP $950 / SALE PRICE $570
  • Winston AIR 9’ 6wt, MSRP $950 / SALE PRICE $570
  • Winston Boron III LS 9’ 5wt, MSRP $795 / SALE PRICE $477
  • Winston Boron III Plus Freshwater 9’ 6wt, MSRP $875 / SALE PRICE $525
  • Winston Boron III TH 11’ 6wt, MSRP $950 / SALE PRICE $570
  • Thomas & Thomas Aeros 905-4 9’ 5wt, MSRP $795 / SALE PRICE $477
  • Scott Radian 905-4 9’ 5wt, MSRP $795 / SALE PRICE $477
  • Scott Radian 906-4 9’ 6wt, MSRP $795 / SALE PRICE $477
  • Scott Radian 956-4 9’6” 6wt, MSRP $795 / SALE PRICE $477
  • Scott Radian 957-4 9’6” 7wt, MSRP $795 / SALE PRICE $477
  • Scott Radian 1007-4 10’ 7wt, MSRP $795 / SALE PRICE $477
  • Echo Glass 1084 10’8” 4wt Trout Spey, MSRP $300 / SALE PRICE $180
  • Echo Glass 1297 12’9” 7wt Spey, MSRP $300 / SALE PRICE $180
  • Echo 3 1276 12’7” 6 wt. Spey Rod,  MSRP $559.00 / SALE PRICE $336.00
  • Echo TR2 4113 11’3” 4wt Trout Spey, MSRP $379 / $227
  • Redington Dually (2018 model) 4109-4 10’9” 4wt Trout Spey, MSRP $250 / SALE PRICE $163
  • Redington Dually (2018 model) 7130-4 13 7wt Spey, MSRP $250 / SALE PRICE $163
  • Cortland Competition Nymph 10’6” 3wt, MSRP $250 / SALE PRICE $163

Demo Reels, include basic dacron backing

  • Hatch Gen 2 Finatic 4 Plus MA, Clear/Red, MSRP $500 /  SALE PRICE $300
  • Hatch Gen 2 Finatic 5 Plus MA, Clear/Green, MSRP $550.00/ SALE PRICE $330.00
  • Hatch Gen 2 Finatic 5 Plus MA Clear/Black MSRP $550.00/ SALE PRICE $330.00
  • Hatch Gen 2 Finatic 5 Plus LA, Clear/Green, MSRP $550.00/ SALE PRICE $330.00
  • Hatch Gen 2 Finatic 5 Plus MA, Black/Silver, MSRP $550.00/ SALE PRICE $330.00
  • Hatch Gen 2 Finatic 7 Plus LA, Clear/Blue, MSRP $650.00/ SALE PRICE $390.00
  • Sage Spectrum LT 5/6, Black Spruce/Silver, MSRP $249.00 / SALE PRICE $150.00
  • Orvis Battenkill Disc Reel Size I MSRP $149 / SALE PRICE $90
  • Ross Colorado LT 0-3 Reel, Matte Black, MSRP $285 /  SALE PRICE $171
  • Ross Colorado LT 3-4 Reel, Matte Black, MSRP $290 /  SALE PRICE $174
  • Ross Evolution R 4/5 Reel, Matte Black, MSRP $465 /  SALE PRICE $279
  • Ross Evolution R 4/5 Reel, Platinum, MSRP $465 /  SALE PRICE $279
  • Ross Evolution R 5/6 Reel, Matte Black, MSRP $475 /  SALE PRICE $285

Clearance Reels – All brand new, discontinued models

  • Ross Animas 4/5, Stealth Black with Bronze,  MSRP $260 / SALE PRICE $156
  • Ross Animas 4/5, Granite with Bronze,  MSRP $260 / SALE PRICE $156
  • Ross Animas 5/6, Granite Black with Bronze,  MSRP $275 / SALE PRICE $165
  • Abel Super 3N Large Arbor Spool, Gloss Black, MSRP $200 / SALE PRICE $120
The Five Gallon Bucket

The Five Gallon Bucket

On many warm summer weekends you can find me out one of my favorite lakes, casting flies for trout.  I particularly enjoy the long casts and relaxed pace of cast and retrieve angling with either floating or intermediate lines, searching likely parts of the lake with a damsel or Callibaetis nymph.

In my experience there are really only two things that can ruin the calm that I find in this type of fishing.  The first is a grab from a nice trout, but you will never hear me complain about that!  The second is a tangled mess of fly line clogging up my stripping guide during a cast.

Fortunately, I’ve found a simple, inexpensive piece of gear that solves this annoying problem while offering some additional benefits.  What is this piece of gear?

The Five Gallon Bucket.

Yes, that kind of five gallon bucket.  The kind that drywall mud, or paint, or an completely excessive volume of mayonnaise might come in.  The kind that you can find for $2 or $3 at your local hardware store or for $0.25 at a neighbor’s garage sale.

Here is how it works.  Get yourself a five gallon bucket and bring it with you in the boat next time you go out on the lake.  When you get situated and anchored up and ready to fish, scoop up some lake water in the bucket – enough to cover the whole bottom to a depth of ¾ of an inch or so.  Make your cast, and instead of retrieving the line onto the boat deck like you normally do, retrieve it into the bucket.  When you make your next cast, you’ll notice a couple of things:

  1. The fly line shoots without tangling thanks to the magical properties of water and surface tension, and because the wind or motion of the boat was not able to move the loose coils of fly line around and create interwoven loops of line.
  2. The fly line shoots like a dream because it is lubricated by the water in the bucket and because no dirt, sand, and grit from the boat deck stuck to the line between casts.
  3. As the day becomes warmer with the climbing sun, you may also notice that, compared to when you used to strip your line onto the hot boat deck, your fly line stays cooler (and therefore stiffer) which also reduces tangles and improves shooting.
  4. As the season progresses, you may notice that your fly line is showing less wear than you might expect given the number of days you’ve been out here. The bucket is the reason!  Using it keeps the grit off the line and contains it while keeping you from accidentally stepping on it in the boat.

Are you convinced yet?  Saltwater guys have been using variation of stripping baskets and buckets for years.  I don’t know why it took me so long to do this on the lakes.  Give it a try!  You may already have a five gallon bucket in your garage.  If not, you can go and buy two of them for less than the price of a spool of your favorite fluorocarbon tippet!  Definitely get two, because your boat partner is going to want one when they see you using it.

I got mine at Lowes because I liked the blue color.  I think other places have orange ones, red ones, and white ones.  Nice.  Then, I put a few cool decals on mine to cover up the hardware store logo and make it look like a really fancy and expensive piece of fly fishing kit instead of… a five gallon bucket.  Sweet.

A couple more added bonuses that I’ve found:

  1. If I’m moving a short distance between spots, I just strip my line into the bucket and then put the rod butt into the bucket as well to keep everything tidy while I move the boat. As long as I’m not going full throttle everything stays together.
  2. If you happen to be a parent who likes to have their little one out on the lake with you, get an extra bucket for your boat. My toddler always seems to want to play in the water when we get out on the lake, and his mom and I have found that filling up the bucket with lake water turns it into an awesome toy!

Until next time.

Take Care and Fish On,

Matt

Non-Felt Soled Wading Boots: A Couple of Options from Simms

Non-Felt Soled Wading Boots: A Couple of Options from Simms

When Yellowstone National Park announced that felt soled wading boots would be banned starting this season, it marked the beginning of a new era in our region for fly shops and anglers alike.  Every fly shop in the region has started to stock multiple non-felt soled options, and our rental fleet had a complete overhaul.  While many of us at Big Sky Anglers have used non-felt soled wading boots confidently for many years, there are still plenty of anglers who have continued using their felt soled boots out of confidence, or simply because they were waiting for them to wear out before switching to a non-felt option.  Well, for those holdouts who love fishing the Park, the time to switch is now.  We recommend that you embrace the change.  Like barbless hooks, they are a change that creates new challenges in angling that may ultimately benefit the resource.  The altered traction may take some getting used to, but in the long run you’ll be wading and fishing like you always have.  In fact, there are some situations where non-felt soled boots offer far BETTER traction than felt ever did.

If you are thinking about a new pair of non-felt soled wading boots this year, we’ve decided to do a bit of a writeup on a couple of the options that we sell from Simms to help you in your decision.  We carry a full lineup of the Vaportread (Men’s and Women’s) and Freestone a the shop currently, and are able to special order any other boots from Simms, including the new G3 Guide Boot.  Hopefully you find this little review helpful.

Have Fun and Wade On,

The BSA Crew

VAPORTREAD (Men’s) – Vibram Soles

MSRP $179.95

From Simms:

From high-elevation rivulets to coring into no-man’s land with nothing but bear mace and Ramen noodle rations, Simms’ new VaporTread® Boot gets you into the thick of it – faster. Its lightweight, minimalist design is maximized by a VaporTread® platform/4.0mm Vibram® Megagrip rubber outsole that effectively bridges the worlds of superior hiking speeds and traction-enhanced wading performance. Features include a synthetic leather, textile, and scratch rubber upper that, combined with an anatomical top collar, work with your feet for all-day, blister-free trailblazing. Internals are precision lined with plush neoprene where it counts, generating warmth, redefining comfort, and guaranteeing on/off ease whether it’s time to rally – or rest – your dogs.

  • Waterproof synthetic leather, rip‐stop nylon & scratch rubber upper
  • Partial neoprene lining  & anatomical collar
  • ESS plates for improved cleat retention & proprioception
  • Dual‐density midsole for shock absorption
  • APPROX. WEIGHT: 52.8 oz.

Our Take:

These are indeed a nice, light weight wading boot option that is super comfy.  If you feel like standard wading boots are just too beefy, stiff, and heavy for your liking, this is a superb option.  We joke that these are the basketball sneakers of the wading boot world, but in reality they are more like a nice hiking boot.  They will work great if you are looking for a boot that can do double duty.  Wear them over your waders on the roadside runs of the Madison in the Park in June and October and then swap to a set of wet-wading socks and quick dry pants and hike them deep into the Yellowstone backcountry for August!

If you are looking for a boot to screw metal studs into for added traction, this is probably not the boot for you.  Check out the Freestone, below.

VAPORTREAD (Women’s) – Vibram Soles

MSRP $179.95

From Simms:

Lightweight, high-output boots meet all day comfort Wade confidently in Simms’ award-winning Women’s VaporTread® Boot, powered by a hiker-inspired design and the always-agile VaporTread™ underfoot platform. Features include the unmatched durability of a synthetic leather, textile and scratch-rubber upper. Partially-lined neoprene internals add appreciated wading warmth, cushioning, and easy-on/easy-off performance. And Simms’ precision women’s fit – that works with your feet for bolstered support from bottom to top – puts a long haul to feeding fish within easy reach.

  • Waterproof synthetic leather, rip‐stop nylon & scratch rubber upper
  • Partial neoprene lining & anatomical collar
  • ESS plates for improved cleat retention & proprioception
  • APPROX. WEIGHT: 44.9 oz.

Our Take:

Ladies rejoice.  Light weight, comfy, and shaped for your feet. Beyond that, our take on these matches our take on the Men’s Vaportread.  These are indeed a nice, light weight wading boot option that is super comfy.  If you feel like standard wading boots are just too beefy, stiff, and heavy for your liking, this is a superb option.  We joke that these are the basketball sneakers of the wading boot world, but in reality they are more like a nice hiking boot.  They will work great if you are looking for a boot that can do double duty.  Wear them over your waders on the roadside runs of the Madison in the Park in June and October and then swap to a set of wet-wading socks and quick dry pants and hike them deep into the Yellowstone backcountry for August!

If you are looking for a boot to screw metal studs into for added traction, this is probably not the boot for you.  Check out the Freestone, below.

FREESTONE – Rubber Soles

MSRP $149.95

From Simms:

Navigating strong currents and slippery rock river beds is part of the experience. Our Freestone® Boot has a proven record of durability and traction in rocky rivers around the world. It provides the support underfoot and at the ankle for negotiating slick, unseen river bottoms. The synthetic uppers take the abuse of brush, rock and water in stride, while a cushioned midsole and partial neoprene lining provide all-day cushioning and warmth.

  • Waterproof synthetic leather & scratch rubber upper
  • Partial neoprene lining
  • Dual‐density EVA midsole for shock absorption

Our Take:

The Freestone has always been a classic boot from Simms.  The combination of rugged design, comfortable fit, and wallet friendly price point has made it a top choice for our customers and guides for years.  The Freestone is a burlier boot than the Vaportread, so if your fishing style requires more aggressive wading,a bit less hiking, or you just like a taller upper with more ankle support, this might be a good boot for you.

According to Matt, who has fished in both of these boots and spent a lot of hours on the steelhead rivers of the PNW, the Freestone is also a better choice if you intend to add screw in studs for the extra traction you might need on basalt rivers like the Deschutes or North Umpqua.  Another tip on the Freestone:  If you have a low volume foot or simply like the comfort offered by Superfeet footbed liners, the freestone will accept those aftermarket footbeds with ease, while the Vaportread generally will not.

Ladies, unfortunately the Freestone is a unisex boot.  But fear not, as many of the women we know fish in these.  Just drop down one or 1.5 sizes from your women’s street shoe size and try those on first. 

G3 GUIDE BOOT – Vibram Soles

MSRP $229.95

From Simms:

Time spent on the river is knowledge. And the more time you spend on the river, the more your gear needs to perform at a high level. Our G3 Guide™ Wading Boot is designed with working guides in mind. This means the support, traction and durability that 200-plus days on the river demand. The boot features big-time ankle support and an enhanced feel underfoot to help you get to hard-to-reach places. Our Rivertread® build gives you more feeling under your boot, so the unseen becomes easier to navigate without compromising on the overall support or traction of the boot. With proven durability to handle the wear and tear of hiking and wading day in and day out, the G3 Guide™ Boot gives you confidence to move across rocky river bottoms anywhere in the world.

  • Waterproof nubuck leather & lace‐to‐toe upper
  • High abrasion textile with full scratch rubber rand
  • Molded external TPU heel counter & heel clip
  • Dual‐density midsole for shock absorption
  • ESS plates for improved cleat retention & proprioception
  • APPROX. WEIGHT: 62.4 oz.

Our Take:

While we aren’t carrying a full line of these at the flyshop yet, a couple of our guides have been wearing these, and if their feelings on them are accurate we may need to carry them for the fall. These are beefy, burly boots that are rugged but comfortable.  If you are/were a fan of the discontinued Simms Rivershed boot, you might recognize a lot of that legendary workhorse’s genetics in the new G3.  Virtually 360 degree rubber rand for durability and minimal leather to eliminate stiffening and shrinking when dry.  Like the Freestone, these are great option for anglers who intend to add screw in studs or aftermarket footbeds.

These boots follow typical Simms sizing, so if you’d like a pair of these, just give us a call and we’d be happy to order them for you.

Flylines and the AFFTA Standard:   What’s in a Number?   or  When is a 6wt line really an 8wt line?

Flylines and the AFFTA Standard: What’s in a Number? or When is a 6wt line really an 8wt line?

The short answers –

NOT MUCH, and

MORE OFTEN THAN YOU THINK.

But the long answers are much more interesting, and hopefully quite useful to you as an angler, so here goes nothing.

It starts out with a history lesson, of course.  Once upon a time, long, long ago, the physical weight of virtually all manufactured fly lines was done according to something called the AFTMA (American Fishing Tackle Manufacturers Association) Standard or the AFFTA (American Fly Fishing Trade Association) Standard.  Those standards were developed around 1959, to ideally bring some standardization to an industry which had, according to accounts I’ve read, run rampant for a while, creating confusion among anglers and manufacturers alike.  The idea was that the physical weight of the first 30 feet of a fly line (excluding level tip) would conform to an industry standard for the given line rating.  For example, this would make all 6-weight fly lines, in theory, more or less the same weight for the first 30 feet.  In a perfect world, this system would also serve to bring some standardization to the labeling of fly rods, making rod/line pairings (more on this later) easier.  As far as fly line taper, head length, and overall head weight, though, all bets were off.  But in the early days of synthetic fly lines, double taper lines were king, and our modern complex tapers were barely a dream, so it didn’t matter much.

The AFFTA Standard for single hand fly lines (not Spey lines or shooting heads) remains the same to this day.  Here is the table.  If you are like me, you’ll want to print one of these out for your wallet or save the image in your smartphone.  You’ll see why in a minute.

Where are we now?

The standards were developed in the late 1950s.  I didn’t come around to fly fishing until the early 1980s, and didn’t really get into the nitty gritty until the 1990s.  So, for some of this history I’m relying on second and third hand accounts.  An engineer by training, my brain desperately hopes that the industry strictly followed the standards, at least for a while.  One thing I do know for sure is that line manufacturers no longer follow that standard in most cases.  It is actually rather challenging to find a modern fly line that conforms to AFFTA Standards.  And, if you are like me, who typically really likes how rods cast when lined at or near the AFFTA Standard, just buying a fly line based on a product description and a numerical line rating on the box NO LONGER WORKS MOST OF THE TIME!

What the… ? 

When is a 6wt line really an 8wt?

I do a lot of research on fly lines, both for myself, my friends, and for Big Sky Anglers.  As a result, I’ve been exposed to a wide variety of fly line designs – tapers, 30-feet weights, total head weights, head lengths, cores, and coatings vary WIDELY from line to line and brand to brand.  I love taper diagrams, tables, and spreadsheets that might give me a hint about how a line will cast when paired with a given rod for a specific fishing approach.  The more research I do, the more variations from the standard I find.  Even for someone who likes this stuff, it can be downright confusing.  For most folks that I know who just want to get a smooth casting outfit that is fun to fish with, it’s just black magic.

Why doesn’t the industry follow the industry standard?  It’s a good question.  There are more than a few answers that I’ve heard.  One or more of them may be the reason for the divergence.  Or not.  It’s basically a game of finger pointing.  Some say that modern, super-fast action graphite fly rods have become so stiff that a rod rated as a 6wt, really casts and flexes more like a 7wt or 8wt, despite its super light feel in hand.  And, as a result, line manufacturers have altered their numbering just so that their 6wt line feels right on that aforementioned 6wt rod (even though it’s really a mislabeled 8wt rod).  Many in this camp would like to see a full revision of the AFFTA Standards that conforms more with our modern fast action graphite rods that it did to historical fiberglass and cane rods with slower actions that were the norm at the time the original standards were developed.  Others blame casting ability, and the common desire for instant gratification without effort.   Those pundits say that poor casting ability among the masses has forced line manufacturers to create heavier and heavier fly lines so that those without the skills needed to properly load a fly rod at typical casting distances can actually FEEL something and get a cast out past the end of the driftboat oars.

The thing is, the reason for the departure from the standards isn’t important when it comes to picking the right line for you.  Fly line and fly rod manufacturers aren’t all of a sudden going to change how they label things just because there are guys like me that wish they would.  And there are still plenty of folks who own and enjoy fishing with glass, cane, and fuller flexing graphite rods.  So, what is most important is that you, as an angling consumer, are informed about this topic well enough to be able to make the right choices when it comes to your next big $ fly line purchase.  At a baseline, you should be informed enough to be able to ASK THE RIGHT QUESTIONS when you are talking to an employee at a fly shop or a line manufacturer.

What are some things you need to know in order to get this right?

First, the good news is that modern graphite rods are typically designed with a progressive flex pattern, and are able to accommodate a variety of line weights both above and below their labeled rating, assuming the caster has a reasonable level of skill.  So perfection is not required to achieve functionality.  The bad news is that your rod might not FEEL as sweet as you want it to without the right line on it.

In the past, there was always a lot of talk about up-lining stiff rods to get more flex and feel out of them.  In many cases with modern lines, the manufacturers have essentially done that for you by creating a line labeled as a 6wt that meets the AFFTA standards for a 7 or even an 8wt rod.  Be aware of this trend, because if you were used to up-lining in the past based on the AFFTA standard, and do that with a modern line that is already up-lined at the factory, you may end up with something way heavier than you wanted.

When you decide to buy a new fly line, at baseline you should go to your local fly shop and talk with the in-house fly line nerd armed with an understanding of:

  1. What fly rod you own, and what the rod’s action is (fast/stiff, medium-fast, medium, slow). If you aren’t sure, bring it to the shop.  If you are sure, also bring it to the shop!
  2. What type of fishing you do, and at what distances. If you are a small water angler, nympher, long distance dry fly guy, lake specialist, streamer junkie, etc it will influence the line you choose.
  3. Your casting ability level, currently, including power application, tracking, typical amount of line you like to carry in the air when casting, etc. Be honest with yourself.
  4. Your goals for improving your casting ability. Everyone can get better.
  5. How you like to achieve distance. Do you like to shoot line for distance or carry more line in the air and shoot less for distance?

You should also go into the fly shop ready to ask some questions about the fly line that they might suggest for you.  Fly line manufacturer websites can also be a good source of this information.  At baseline, for weight forward fly lines, be prepared to ask:

  1. What is the head length of the fly line?
  2. How much does the first 30 feet of the head weigh (aka, the 30-feet weight)? And, how does that relate to the AFFTA Standard for that line weight.
  3. How much does the total head weigh, assuming it is longer than 30 feet?
  4. How does the fly line taper relate to my preferred fishing style and skill level? This is another can-of-worms topic that may need its own blog post.  Just remember, even if the manufacturer names a line something like “salmon and steelhead” or “indicator”, it doesn’t mean those lines are necessarily bad for the fishing you do which doesn’t involve those things.  Go at it with an open mind.
  5. Do you have any demo lines that we could cast on my rod out in the parking lot? This is the consumer’s ace in the hole.  If you can cast a line before you buy, DO IT.  Understand, however, that it is impossible for a shop to have demos of every line they carry on the shelves.

Without going down the rabbit hole of fly line taper design, if you can answer basic questions about your rod and your casting (the first list), and can get the answers to the questions about fly line choices (the second list) from your local fly shop, the line manufacturers website, or from the CIA, then you are ready to make an informed decision.  I would recommend following these general guidelines to start, and remember, if you can cast the line on your rod before you buy it, DO IT, and do it with a fly on leader rig that you intend to fish.

This is your brain on AFFTA Standards

When to Consider a Line “Way Heavier” than the AFFTA Standard

By “Way Heavier” I mean something like a 30-feet weight equivalent to 1.5 or 2 line sizes above the AFFTA Standard.   Consider a line of this type when you are:

  • a beginner level caster, and own a fast/stiff action rod
  • a caster who needs or likes to feel a lot of rod loading in order to cast your best, and own a fast/stiff action rod
  • an intermediate or advanced level caster, own a fast/stiff action or medium fast action rod, and fish almost exclusively at very close range
  • any level caster, and like to load the rod very quickly with minimal line out of the rod tip, and shoot to achieve distance (As a side note, using a short, 30-feet long head flyline the equivalent to 2 lines sizes heavier than the AFFTA standard is essentially the definition of a “shooting head”). You will sacrifice the ability to carry longer amounts of line in the air as a result of this choice.

When to Consider a Line “A Bit Heavier” than the AFFTA Standard

Here, by “A Bit Heavier” I mean something like a 30-feet weight equivalent to 0.5 to 1 size above the AFFTA Standard.  Consider a line of this type when you:

  • a beginner level caster, and own a medium or medium-fast action rod
  • a caster who needs or likes to feel a lot of rod loading in order to cast your best, and own a medium or medium-fast action rod
  • an intermediate level caster, and own a fast/stiff action rod
  • a caster who needs or likes to feel some clear rod loading on shorter casts in order to cast your best, and own a fast/stiff action rod
  • an angler who primarily fishes at close to medium ranges (say 45 feet or less)
  • an angler who is happy with carrying a medium amount of line in the air and shooting for extra distance when it is called for.

When to Consider a Line Weighing Similar to the AFFTA Standard

Here, by “Similar to” I mean something like a 30-feet weight within the AFFTA Acceptable Weight Range in the table above.  Consider a line of this type when you:

  • a beginner level caster, and own a slow action rod
  • a caster who needs or likes to feel a lot of rod loading in order to cast your best, and own a slow action rod
  • an intermediate level caster, and own a medium action rod
  • a caster who needs or likes to feel some clear rod loading on shorter casts in order to cast your best, and own a medium action rod
  • an advanced level caster, and own a fast/stiff action rod
  • a caster who is ok with feeling minimal rod loading on short range casts and can still cast your best, and own a fast or medium-fast action rod
  • an angler who regularly fishes at medium to longer ranges (say 45 feet or more) and is capable of adjusting power application for shorter casts to still achieve good results
  • an angler who likes to carry a longer amount of line in the air and shoot less for extra distance, or an angler looking to both carry a long amount of line in the air and shoot significant line for extra distance. (Note that for the latter case the overall head length and fly line taper design you choose will be of utmost importance)

And with that, I believe I have said enough.  I have probably dug myself into a hole that I may never emerge from, and/or guaranteed that I will receive a series of corrective emails and texts from my casting nerd friends.  At the very least, I hope that this saves some of you who are thinking about getting a new fly line some trouble, and that you are able to find the joy that is a properly paired rod/line combination that meets your casting and fishing style.

Take Care and Fish On,  Matt

Check us out on Instagram…

This past winter I started an Instagram account to help promote the business and also cause I really just love taking pictures.  What I like most is that Instagram is about capturing images of everyday life with your phone.   Taking photos, for me, goes back to childhood.  Growing up, my father took A LOT of photographs of our outings with a Nikon film camera, that, at the time, was a great camera.  Those printed photos are sitting in the basement of my folk’s house back in Quincy and are super fun to look at when Molly and I make it back to the homeland for a visit.  To me, photos are a visual time line that mark periods of my life.  Periods that can almost be forgotten as the memories stack up over time.  As I get older, capturing these moments is almost as important as the moments themselves.  When I’m old, gray and no longer able to row a boat, I’ll have photographs to remind me of the good ole days.

Round three – more from Molly

Best Book of 2014: Wait for Signs, by Craig Johnson

Good books mark my life by chapter and verse. I own many of them. We moved last spring, a little deeper into the forests of Horse Butte. When we bought our new place, I refused to consider living there until I found a place for my bookshelves. Joe and I packed up Pony, Stella, and Oscar, along with everything else which makes up Big Sky Anglers: rods, reels, hackles, hooks, flies, hoodies, hats, wading boots, computers, printers, fax machines, boats, kayaks, oars, old Toyotas, scanners, filing cabinets, waders with holes, waders without holes, rod tubes, books about trout, photos, articles, cameras, bird dog collars, kennels, shotguns, the Dirty Harry pistol (which Joe used to hide in my magazine basket until I pitched a fit), fishing shirts, Joe’s dress shirt, socks, jackets, leaders, tippet, fly lines, and two broken guitar cases. In addition to my books, I brought along a small suitcase of clothes, two NPS flat hats, and 24 pairs of skis.

Almost as important to me as my books is Wyoming.  The land speaks through sagebrush, cowboys, broken china tossed off Conestoga wagons, and abandoned sod dugouts in the middle of the prairie. Wyoming is full of elk, pronghorn (antelope), cows, cowboys, deer, and wind. Lots of wind. Mountains, bluebirds, and crisp fall mornings soothe the wounds created by its harshness. Since a lot of great authors also enjoy the state, I possess a fine collection of Wyoming writers, including Craig Johnson, Annie Proulx, Mark Spragg, Gretl Erlich, and CJ Box.  They write about the rowdy surroundings and the survivors who call it home.

Between Meeteetse and Thermopolis, Highway 171 cuts through the rough country in a futile attempt of control and symmetry. All around are ridges of rock hiding coulees, dips, and valleys full of antelope, red-tailed hawks, and golden eagles. Geology takes precedence over the engineering egos of the WY Department of Transportation, as the narrow road winds its way south. I love this stretch. Austere in its presentation of natural wonders, it’s a far cry from the in-your-face drama of Glacier or Yellowstone. Wyoming begs you to look for the unknown, hidden at first among a seemingly boring setting of dirt, sagebrush and drab color.  But watch for morning sunlight or evening fade, and the earth turns pink and purple. Walk around until you stumble upon the Legend Rock petroglyphs, where people used stone walls into artistic canvases for thousands of years. Hear the stories of the people of Wyoming, hacking a life out of the wilderness and bearing their children along the way. And wait-just wait-until you meet Wyoming personified, Sheriff Walt Longmire.

In Craig Johnson’s Wait for Signs (2014), twelve short stories give personal profiles of America’s favorite sheriff, Walt Longmire.  Walt is the main character in a series of novels, recently adapted into A&E’s Longmire. Johnson originally wrote these short works as Post-Its, annual Christmas gifts to readers that subscribe to his email newsletter. Amidst a wintry holiday backdrop, Walt rescues hitchhikers on Christmas Eve, hands out presents from the back of a wrecked Toys-R-Us semi, and investigates miscreant residents of the local old folk’s home. Like the main character in any good crime series, Walt Longmire is always in the thick of a case, even if his jurisdiction is the middle of nowhere, Absaroka County, Wyoming.

Several years ago I first met Walt Longmire one cold night in Lamar Valley. Actually, I was attending a weeklong course at the Yellowstone Association Institute-Lesser Known Scats of Porcupines, Mating Calls of Bison, or some other such awkward and intimate animal knowledge. While wolves howled outside, I huddled in my tiny log cabin with a headlamp and a bottle of wine and read almost all of The Cold Dish.  I laughed, I cried, I had to replace my headlamp batteries, and I fell in love with Walt and his perspective of the world. Thankfully I know a thing or two about Yellowstone, because the next morning I was worthless.  Walt says, “It wasn’t that revenge was a dish best served cold, it was that it was a dish best not served at all.” Cold Dish is the first of ten in the Longmire series.  Set in the fictional town of Durant, Absaroka County, Wyoming, his jurisdiction covers the least populated county in the Lower 48. Born and bred in Durant, Walt was elected sheriff shortly after playing all-state tackle at USC and serving with the Marines in Vietnam.  He’s a big man, nearly 6’4 and 240, although his intimidating physical presence is often balanced by a friendly smile. He wears blue jeans and a cowboy hat with his sheriff’s star and sidearm. His department includes Ruby, who mothers Walt as much as she dispatches calls; Double Tough, a former oil rig welder, the Ferg, who ties flies and scouts good fishing holes while on duty, and Vic, who gave up a fast-paced career with the Philadelphia police department to follow her engineer husband for job in the Bighorn Basin oil fields. Henry Standing Bear, Walt’s best friend since childhood, steers Walt true with constant companionship.  Walt’s daughter Cady is an East Coast trial lawyer and constant reminder of her mother Martha, who dies of cancer before we ever meet Walt for the first time.

Longmire is a hero, a comic, a ladies’ man, a lawman, a father, friend, and completely infallible.  Propelled by a clear sense of right and wrong, his heart usually finds the right way to get there. In my favorite story, “Ministerial Aid,” Walt confronts a domestic abuse situation. A few things are a little odd about his approach- he’s hung over and wearing a bathrobe. Its New Years day and Walt finds himself in between the troubled couple, all the while still confronting his grief about Martha’s recent death. His own redemption emerges from helping others besides himself.  He thinks, “Just then, I thought I might’ve caught sight of that first ray that shoots over the edge of the earth like a hopeful thought, and maybe, just maybe I might’ve felt something. ‘Well, like the rest of us…’[Walt] sighed. ‘She’s just waiting on something.’”

Walt’s way with women follows him on most cases. In the “Divorce Horse,” he and fellow Absaroka County heartthrob and his best friend Henry Standing Bear look for a stolen pony. Walt muses,  “The much-storied case of the divorce horse was the kind of situation familiar to most rural sheriffs, one of those disputes you ended up getting involved in even thought it had nothing much to do with law enforcement.” Johnson inserts hints of his involvement with Undersheriff Victoria Moretti, who is half Walt’s age and moves twice as fast.

Faithful BSA readers might feel tricked by my post, as they realize I’m not reviewing a book full of fish. Ha! Gotcha. In a scene from “Messenger”, Henry and Walt catch a few creels full of brookies, with designs on releasing them into the frying pan for dinner. Ok, so it’s not Isaaz Walton. But it is full of wit, humanity, and most importantly, Wyoming. Not ready for a full book of Walt just yet? Dip in slowly with Wait for Signs.